Best Kayaking in Mississippi

Trying to find the best kayaking in Mississippi? Bivy has great hiking, biking, paddling, climbing, skiing, riding and more, with hand-curated trail maps, as well as detailed driving directions.

1

Mississippi, Grenada County

02 :45 hrs
6.5 mi
1.7613754 ft
I

The Yalobusha River is full of pleasant surprises and meanderings and is a paddler’s paradise from the dam in Grenada to its end. Claimed to be “one of Mississippi’s treasures,” it flows through the Malmaison Wildlife Management Area, displays sycamore, birch, maple, and willow forests along its banks, hosts and abundance of wildlife from beaver to red-tailed hawks and blue herons, and possesses some fine sandbars and clear water. It is floatable at virtually any level; even in flood the river is fairly docile. There are many opportunities for camping and other outdoor recreational opportunities along its path. This route flows through the gorgeous Malmaison Wildlife Management Area for about half its distance.

2

Mississippi, Biloxi

01 :28 hrs
3.5 mi
7.593504 ft
III

Launched at Kuhn Street boat ramp and kayaked down the north side of Deer Island.

3

Mississippi, Pike County

02 :53 hrs
6.8 mi
7.4956665 ft
I

The Bogue Chitto River is tiny and logjammed in its upper reaches but as it extends into Pike County, it widens into one of the prettiest and most popular paddling rivers in Mississippi. It is not too small that you are constantly fighting logjams yet not too big that you are forever fighting headwinds. It has a swift current with sharp bends and submerged logs that will keep your attention. The river abounds in wildlife, the water is clear and the scenery is gorgeous, alternating with woods and sandbars. This stretch offers a very pleasant float with gorgeous forested scenery. It can become very busy on weekends and in the summer, especially as you approach the water park. There are canoe rental companies available near the park as well.

4

Mississippi, Tishomingo County

12 :20 hrs
29 mi
4.399925 ft
I

The Tennessee Tombigbee Waterway links the Tennessee and Tombigbee Rivers in northeast Mississippi. It has no current, is frequented by barges and motorboats, and often presents nothing more than a rock-lined canal. But it is one of the major waterways in the South and it passes through some superb wildlife areas. It is quite popular with many types of watercraft. Wildlife abounds along the waterway, beautiful hardwood forests and brushy areas fill the banks, and many campgrounds are nearby. With so many boat ramps and access points, paddling options are limitless. Bay Springs Lake is one of the most beautiful spots on the waterway. The beach-rimmed, piney-woods lake contains countless coves big and small. It is heavily used on summer weekends, but at off times the lake may be virtually deserted. The lock drops you 84 feet where you can have a whole new experience and new vistas.

5

Mississippi, Tishomingo County

05 :56 hrs
14 mi
6.799988 ft
I

The Tennessee Tombigbee Waterway links the Tennessee and Tombigbee Rivers in northeast Mississippi. It has no current, is frequented by barges and motorboats, and often presents nothing more than a rock-lined canal. But it is one of the major waterways in the South and it passes through some superb wildlife areas. It is quite popular with many types of watercraft. Wildlife abounds along the waterway, beautiful hardwood forests and brushy areas fill the banks, and many campgrounds are nearby. With so many boat ramps and access points, paddling options are limitless. This area is actually a lake and is well-worth exploring. It contains rocky bluffs draped with forests that display phenomenal foliage in the fall.

6

Mississippi, Pike County

02 :08 hrs
5.1 mi
9.762527 ft
I

The Bogue Chitto River is tiny and logjammed in its upper reaches but as it extends into Pike County, it widens into one of the prettiest and most popular paddling rivers in Mississippi. It is not too small that you are constantly fighting logjams yet not too big that you are forever fighting headwinds. It has a swift current with sharp bends and submerged logs that will keep your attention. The river abounds in wildlife, the water is clear and the scenery is gorgeous, alternating with woods and sandbars. This section includes perhaps the finest stretch on the river from Bogue Chitto Water Park to just below Highway 48 in Walthall. The river is narrow enough to provide shade, tricky enough not to be dull, and has little sign of human presence. Wildlife is abundant and ospreys are frequently spotted.

7

Mississippi, Covington County

04 :02 hrs
9.5 mi
11.642513 ft
II

Mississippi is not a state that has a lot of whitewater. Several streams have occasional chutes and drop-offs, but only the Okatoma is renowned for its whitewater. The Okatoma Creek is just a regular Mississippi creek that happens to have four notable rapids on a popular stretch between Seminary and Sanford. Drawing huge crowds and making the Okatoma one of the most popular floats in the state, these rapids provide quite a thrill. The first rapid contains a fairly easy passage to the left of some rock shoals blocking most of the river. The Chute is a narrow channel on the left that requires paddlers to make a hard right to negotiate the second drop at fast speeds. Okatoma Falls comes 2 miles below the Chute and consists of a straightforward plunge of about 2.5 feet. The last rapids comes right after the falls as the river narrows into a tree-lined gorge and provides some excitement but poses no threat.

8

Mississippi, Perry County

04 :09 hrs
9.8 mi
10.117439 ft
I

Black Creek is Mississippi’s premier paddling stream. For most of its length it is ideal paddling size, avoiding logjams and strainers of a small creek and motorboats and headwinds of a large river. The current is strong and steady with no whitewater and no stagnant pools and it is located largely in the De Soto National Forest and contains wilderness surroundings and gorgeous scenery. Its name comes from the dark, tannin-stained waters. The dark water is highlighted with white sandbars beneath green forest walls. Many wildflowers and wild berries can be found along the river banks as well. This wonderful stretch of river is a designated national Wild and Scenic River and the Black Creek Wilderness Area fills the surrounding land.

9

Mississippi, Hattiesburg

02 :15 hrs
5.4 mi
7.9778214 ft
I

Black Creek is Mississippi’s premier paddling stream. For most of its length it is ideal paddling size, avoiding logjams and strainers of a small creek and motorboats and headwinds of a large river. The current is strong and steady with no whitewater and no stagnant pools and it is located largely in the De Soto National Forest and contains wilderness surroundings and gorgeous scenery. Its name comes from the dark, tannin-stained waters. The dark water is highlighted with white sandbars beneath green forest walls. Many wildflowers and wild berries can be found along the river banks as well. On this stretch you will float down several lovely, meandering miles with quiet, peaceful scenery. On busy weekends and holidays you are likely to meet many others also enjoying this segment of the river.

10

Mississippi, Clarke County

05 :47 hrs
13.6 mi
12.596203 ft
II

The Chickasawhay River flows for 159 miles at the fringe of the Appalachians and contains a variety of beautiful scenery. You will see pretty stone, encounter some muck, pass an intriguing region of waterfalls and alligators, as well as cliffs and swamps. Except for the lower reaches of the river where it becomes wide and deep, the Chickasawhay provides pleasant floating, with good fishing, and relatively little human contact. Because of its remoteness, wildlife thrives here and sightings are common. This section is particularly scenic, with high clay-rock walls and deep woods that range from pine plantations to tropical-type jungle. The sheer bluffs are natural sources of spring water and in springtime, water pours from the mossy clay walls like faucets. Sandbars increase and there are about 10 small sets of easy rapids, including a 2-3 foot drop and a roaring 200-yard-long stretch at the mouth of Shubuta Creek, called Old Shubuta Races.

11

Mississippi, George County

13 :47 hrs
32.5 mi
6.966447 ft
I

The Pascagoula River is the grand waterway of southeast Mississippi and is already sizeable when it officially begins at the juncture of the Leaf and Chickasawhay Rivers. It is a remarkably wild river, bordered for most of its length by the Pascagoula River Wildlife Management Area and the Ward Bayou Wildlife Management Area with several other wildlife areas flanking these and filling the area for miles. On this stretch, Big Black Creek enters from the west and the forested scenery is thick and provides a respectable level of solitude and tranquility.

12

Mississippi, George County

09 :57 hrs
23.5 mi
9.2303505 ft
I

Black Creek is Mississippi’s premier paddling stream. For most of its length it is ideal paddling size, avoiding logjams and strainers of a small creek and motorboats and headwinds of a large river. The current is strong and steady with no whitewater and no stagnant pools and it is located largely in the De Soto National Forest and contains wilderness surroundings and gorgeous scenery. Its name comes from the dark, tannin-stained waters. The dark water is highlighted with white sandbars beneath green forest walls. Many wildflowers and wild berries can be found along the river banks as well. On this section the forest changes and you will begin to see more cypress than pine, with Spanish moss dangling over the water. Springs refresh the river, leaking from low slipper-clay shelves.

13

Mississippi, Perry County

02 :28 hrs
5.8 mi
10.996948 ft
I

Black Creek is Mississippi’s premier paddling stream. For most of its length it is ideal paddling size, avoiding logjams and strainers of a small creek and motorboats and headwinds of a large river. The current is strong and steady with no whitewater and no stagnant pools and it is located largely in the De Soto National Forest and contains wilderness surroundings and gorgeous scenery. Its name comes from the dark, tannin-stained waters. The dark water is highlighted with white sandbars beneath green forest walls. Many wildflowers and wild berries can be found along the river banks as well. Beaverdam Creek enters just below the put-in and is an impressive little brook worth exploring on foot, either by wading or following the segment of Black Creek Trail that loops around it.

14

Mississippi, Itawamba County

04 :44 hrs
11.1 mi
2.6906586 ft
I

The Tennessee Tombigbee Waterway links the Tennessee and Tombigbee Rivers in northeast Mississippi. It has no current, is frequented by barges and motorboats, and often presents nothing more than a rock-lined canal. But it is one of the major waterways in the South and it passes through some superb wildlife areas. It is quite popular with many types of watercraft. Wildlife abounds along the waterway, beautiful hardwood forests and brushy areas fill the banks, and many campgrounds are nearby. With so many boat ramps and access points, paddling options are limitless. The surrounding land on this route contains numerous creeks and rivers that are tributaries to the waterway. Wildlife is abundant, waterfowl are ever-present, and the surrounding forest provides stunning scenery.

15

Mississippi, Itawamba County

03 :27 hrs
8.2 mi
10.996155 ft
I

The Tennessee Tombigbee Waterway links the Tennessee and Tombigbee Rivers in northeast Mississippi. It has no current, is frequented by barges and motorboats, and often presents nothing more than a rock-lined canal. But it is one of the major waterways in the South and it passes through some superb wildlife areas. It is quite popular with many types of watercraft. Wildlife abounds along the waterway, beautiful hardwood forests and brushy areas fill the banks, and many campgrounds are nearby. With so many boat ramps and access points, paddling options are limitless. This section follows the channel through a very scenic, lush forest and ends at a great public use area. Beaver Lake Recreation Area is has a lot of wildlife and has a small lake that is great for a quiet paddle.

16

Mississippi, Forrest County

03 :05 hrs
7.3 mi
7.2615013 ft
I

Black Creek is Mississippi’s premier paddling stream. For most of its length it is ideal paddling size, avoiding logjams and strainers of a small creek and motorboats and headwinds of a large river. The current is strong and steady with no whitewater and no stagnant pools and it is located largely in the De Soto National Forest and contains wilderness surroundings and gorgeous scenery. Its name comes from the dark, tannin-stained waters. The dark water is highlighted with white sandbars beneath green forest walls. Many wildflowers and wild berries can be found along the river banks as well. This stretch runs between broadening sandbars and high bluffs. The stream is narrow and shallow enough in some places to require tricky maneuvering but not hard enough to make you question the worth of the trip. The scenery is very beautiful and intimate.

17

Mississippi, Stone County

08 :33 hrs
20.2 mi
12.618445 ft
I

Black Creek is Mississippi’s premier paddling stream. For most of its length it is ideal paddling size, avoiding logjams and strainers of a small creek and motorboats and headwinds of a large river. The current is strong and steady with no whitewater and no stagnant pools and it is located largely in the De Soto National Forest and contains wilderness surroundings and gorgeous scenery. Its name comes from the dark, tannin-stained waters. The dark water is highlighted with white sandbars beneath green forest walls. Many wildflowers and wild berries can be found along the river banks as well. The creek exits the national forest on this section but the change is not dramatic. More noticeable is the creek’s gradual evolution toward swampy-ness.

18

Mississippi, Tishomingo County

01 :58 hrs
4.6 mi
5.6238556 ft
I

Bear Creek is an exceptionally beautiful small stream that runs through the heart of the Tishomingo State Park, the only state park with canoe rental and shuttle services. The landscape is rocky and hilly, and portions of the creek scoot over rocks for some exciting swifts. Other stretches are long, straight, and without current. While in the park’s boundaries the scenery includes towering stands of forest, tall canyon walls, and foliage that is lush green in the summer and stunningly colorful in the fall. This section begins at the swinging foot bridge in Tishomingo State Park and flows through its thick, lush forest. Once you leave the park, the forest thins a bit and large agricultural fields back the thin line of trees as you continue to the take-out.

19

Mississippi, Clarke County

07 :04 hrs
16.7 mi
7.694504 ft
I

The Chickasawhay River flows for 159 miles at the fringe of the Appalachians and contains a variety of beautiful scenery. You will see pretty stone, encounter some muck, pass an intriguing region of waterfalls and alligators, as well as cliffs and swamps. Except for the lower reaches of the river where it becomes wide and deep, the Chickasawhay provides pleasant floating, with good fishing, and relatively little human contact. Because of its remoteness, wildlife thrives here and sightings are common. This section is particularly scenic, with high clay-rock walls and deep woods that range from pine plantations to tropical-type jungle. The sheer bluffs are natural sources of spring water and in springtime, water pours from the mossy clay walls like faucets.

20

Mississippi, Walthall County

02 :38 hrs
6.3 mi
11.078846 ft
I

Magee’s Creek is a sparking jewel of a stream with crystal clear water and deep, shady woods. There are only about twelve miles on this creek that are floatable but it’s as pretty a place you’re likely to see anywhere. It is a tributary to the Bogue Chitto River and it becomes floatable at Homes Water Park on Highway 198. This stretch is twisty and narrow and may pose problems in extreme low water contains adequate water most of the time. The smaller and more maneuverable the boat, the better. The scenery consists of spring-dampened clay banks and massive, overarching hardwood trees. Because of previous issues with paddlers and landowners, there are strict regulations prohibiting alcohol, firearms, trespassing, and glass or Styrofoam containers.

21

Mississippi, Walthall County

02 :15 hrs
5.4 mi
10.366829 ft
I

Magee’s Creek is a sparking jewel of a stream with crystal clear water and deep, shady woods. There are only about twelve miles on this creek that are floatable but it’s as pretty a place you’re likely to see anywhere. It is a tributary to the Bogue Chitto River and it becomes floatable at Homes Water Park on Highway 198. This stretch is twisty and narrow and may pose problems in extreme low water contains adequate water most of the time. The smaller and more maneuverable the boat, the better. The scenery consists of spring-dampened clay banks and massive, overarching hardwood trees. Because of previous issues with paddlers and landowners, there are strict regulations prohibiting alcohol, firearms, trespassing, and glass or Styrofoam containers.

22

Mississippi, Clarke County

01 :29 hrs
3.5 mi
3.2065659 ft
I

The Chickasawhay River flows for 159 miles at the fringe of the Appalachians and contains a variety of beautiful scenery. You will see pretty stone, encounter some muck, pass an intriguing region of waterfalls and alligators, as well as cliffs and swamps. Except for the lower reaches of the river where it becomes wide and deep, the Chickasawhay provides pleasant floating, with good fishing, and relatively little human contact. Because of its remoteness, wildlife thrives here and sightings are common. This section is particularly scenic, with high clay-rock walls and deep woods that range from pine plantations to tropical-type jungle. The sheer bluffs are natural sources of spring water and in springtime, water pours from the mossy clay walls like faucets.

23

Mississippi, Jackson County

13 :49 hrs
32.5 mi
3.8 ft
I

The Pascagoula River is the grand waterway of southeast Mississippi and is already sizeable when it officially begins at the juncture of the Leaf and Chickasawhay Rivers. It is a remarkably wild river, bordered for most of its length by the Pascagoula River Wildlife Management Area and the Ward Bayou Wildlife Management Area with several other wildlife areas flanking these and filling the area for miles. This section enters the Ward Bayou Wildlife Management Area and does a considerable amount of meandering before it splits into two branches. Continue on the west branch to the take-out at Shepard State Park.

24

Mississippi, Hancock County

05 :33 hrs
6.5 mi
2.3471842 ft
I

The Jourdan River is scarcely a river at all, more of an estuary of St. Louis Bay with virtually no current. McLeod Water Park is the highest public access point on the river, yet even here the Jourdan is wide and deep enough for large motorboats. By paddling and exploring upstream you can escape the motorboat traffic, find the best scenery on the river, and have the opportunity to explore many narrow side passages and oxbow lakes. You will find quiet, lonely waters ringed by gorgeous thick forest, an abundance of birdlife from ospreys to blue herons, and lots of other wildlife and woodland creatures. The river rises and falls with the tide.

25

Mississippi, George County

05 :26 hrs
12.8 mi
3.396203 ft
I

The Pascagoula River is the grand waterway of southeast Mississippi and is already sizeable when it officially begins at the juncture of the Leaf and Chickasawhay Rivers. It is a remarkably wild river, bordered for most of its length by the Pascagoula River Wildlife Management Area and the Ward Bayou Wildlife Management Area with several other wildlife areas flanking these and filling the area for miles. On this stretch the Pascagoula retains elements of hill country, with high bluffs, pine trees, and only intermittent swamps and bayous among the big, beautiful sandbars.

26

Mississippi, Tishomingo County

02 :38 hrs
6.3 mi
6.259918 ft
I

Bear Creek is an exceptionally beautiful small stream that runs through the heart of the Tishomingo State Park, the only state park with canoe rental and shuttle services. The landscape is rocky and hilly, and portions of the creek scoot over rocks for some exciting swifts. Other stretches are long, straight, and without current. While in the park’s boundaries the scenery includes towering stands of forest, tall canyon walls, and foliage that is lush green in the summer and stunningly colorful in the fall. This section of river meanders through thick, lush forest of the Toshomingo State Park and ends next to the swinging foot bridge. The park also has a 45-acre lake for paddling, many nature trails, and many camping opportunities.

27

Mississippi, Harrison County

05 :39 hrs
13.4 mi
16.090622 ft
I

The Wolf River offers near-pristine paddling for more than half its length. The stream begins west of Lumberton but doesn’t become navigable until the Silver Run community southeast of Poplarville and it eventually empties into St. Louis Bay. Its character changes several times making it fascinating to explore. On this stretch, small sandbars grow bigger and the thick forested background provides a quiet getaway. A privately owned primitive campsite on Cemetery Road is available on this route.

28

Mississippi, Walthall County

03 :02 hrs
7.2 mi
7.934883 ft
I

The Bogue Chitto River is tiny and logjammed in its upper reaches but as it extends into Pike County, it widens into one of the prettiest and most popular paddling rivers in Mississippi. It is not too small that you are constantly fighting logjams yet not too big that you are forever fighting headwinds. It has a swift current with sharp bends and submerged logs that will keep your attention. The river abounds in wildlife, the water is clear and the scenery is gorgeous, alternating with woods and sandbars. On this stretch, black and turkey vultures are plentiful and have established the area for roosting and resting. Offsetting the relative homeliness of the buzzards are wildflowers growing along the river, which has widened enough now to receive full sun. The spider flower is especially pretty and it blooms from June through November.

29

Mississippi, Prentiss County

02 :07 hrs
5.2 mi
26.457962 ft
I

The Tennessee Tombigbee Waterway links the Tennessee and Tombigbee Rivers in northeast Mississippi. It has no current, is frequented by barges and motorboats, and often presents nothing more than a rock-lined canal. But it is one of the major waterways in the South and it passes through some superb wildlife areas. It is quite popular with many types of watercraft. Wildlife abounds along the waterway, beautiful hardwood forests and brushy areas fill the banks, and many campgrounds are nearby. With so many boat ramps and access points, paddling options are limitless. Bay Springs Lake is one of the most beautiful spots on the waterway. The beach-rimmed, piney-woods lake contains countless coves big and small. It is heavily used on summer weekends, but at off times the lake may be virtually deserted. The lock drops you 84 feet where you can have a whole new experience and new vistas.

30

Mississippi, Gulfport

08 :02 hrs
19 mi
9.168479 ft
I

The Wolf River offers near-pristine paddling for more than half its length. The stream begins west of Lumberton but doesn’t become navigable until the Silver Run community southeast of Poplarville and it eventually empties into St. Louis Bay. Its character changes several times making it fascinating to explore. The river widens and deepens on this stretch and as a result the current slows. The paddling now feels more coastal, as you pass large sandbars, and beautiful woodland and marsh scenery. Wolf River Canoe and Kayak headquarters offers guided paddle trips through the marshes in and around St. Louis Bay. Two take-out options are passed before reaching Hampton Road, the last access point on the river.

31

Mississippi, Pike County

02 :28 hrs
5.8 mi
7.4749756 ft
I

The Bogue Chitto River is tiny and logjammed in its upper reaches but as it extends into Pike County, it widens into one of the prettiest and most popular paddling rivers in Mississippi. It is not too small that you are constantly fighting logjams yet not too big that you are forever fighting headwinds. It has a swift current with sharp bends and submerged logs that will keep your attention. The river abounds in wildlife, the water is clear and the scenery is gorgeous, alternating with woods and sandbars. This is the farthest upstream that is paddleable and still has plenty of logjams, yet it is a very sweet stretch. It has beautiful green scenery that provides wonderful shade. Birch and sycamore trees reach across the river in places to form a canopy.

32

Mississippi, Grenada County

05 :00 hrs
11.8 mi
4.888088 ft
I

The Yalobusha River is full of pleasant surprises and meanderings and is a paddler’s paradise from the dam in Grenada to its end. Claimed to be “one of Mississippi’s treasures,” it flows through the Malmaison Wildlife Management Area, displays sycamore, birch, maple, and willow forests along its banks, hosts and abundance of wildlife from beaver to red-tailed hawks and blue herons, and possesses some fine sandbars and clear water. It is floatable at virtually any level; even in flood the river is fairly docile. There are many opportunities for camping and other outdoor recreational opportunities along its path.

33

Mississippi, Perry County

04 :30 hrs
10.7 mi
11.254448 ft
I

Black Creek is Mississippi’s premier paddling stream. For most of its length it is ideal paddling size, avoiding logjams and strainers of a small creek and motorboats and headwinds of a large river. The current is strong and steady with no whitewater and no stagnant pools and it is located largely in the De Soto National Forest and contains wilderness surroundings and gorgeous scenery. Its name comes from the dark, tannin-stained waters. The dark water is highlighted with white sandbars beneath green forest walls. Many wildflowers and wild berries can be found along the river banks as well. The river widens a bit on this section as four more creeks flow into it. The natural scenery that fills the creek’s banks is worth every moment spent on the river.

34

Mississippi, Grenada County

08 :05 hrs
19.1 mi
7.711437 ft
I

The Yalobusha River is full of pleasant surprises and meanderings and is a paddler’s paradise from the dam in Grenada to its end. Claimed to be “one of Mississippi’s treasures,” it flows through the Malmaison Wildlife Management Area, displays sycamore, birch, maple, and willow forests along its banks, hosts and abundance of wildlife from beaver to red-tailed hawks and blue herons, and possesses some fine sandbars and clear water. It is floatable at virtually any level; even in flood the river is fairly docile. There are many opportunities for camping and other outdoor recreational opportunities along its path.

35

Mississippi, Jackson County

11 :31 hrs
27.1 mi
3.8 ft
I

The Pascagoula River is the grand waterway of southeast Mississippi and is already sizeable when it officially begins at the juncture of the Leaf and Chickasawhay Rivers. It is a remarkably wild river, bordered for most of its length by the Pascagoula River Wildlife Management Area and the Ward Bayou Wildlife Management Area with several other wildlife areas flanking these and filling the area for miles. This section enters the Ward Bayou Wildlife Management Area and does a considerable amount of meandering before it splits into two branches. Continue on the east branch to a ramp below the Interstate-10 bridge.

36

Mississippi, Jones County

05 :31 hrs
13.1 mi
17.259323 ft
III

The Leaf River, like the Chickasawhay River, flows for more than 150 miles through southeast Mississippi before merging to for the Pascagoula. For most of its length it tends to be a bit small for many motor boaters and a bit big for many paddlers, making it an ideal spot for a quiet getaway. Many other rivers and creeks join the Leaf River along its course and it grows significantly before its terminus. Towering, 70-foot bluffs and dense forest create a secure, closed-in feeling on this section. The river bottom swamps resemble tropical jungles, while high piney bluffs suggest the Rocky Mountains. There are numerous riffles and easy rapids on this route, including a 3-4-foot runnable waterfall called Gordon’s Rock.

37

Mississippi, George County

07 :25 hrs
17.5 mi
5.681611 ft
I

Red Creek heads up around Lumberton and flows southeast, roughly paralleling the Black Creek when later the two creeks merge to form Big Black Creek. Red Creek is a paddling gem and is shallow and sandy as it flows through beautiful forest with much wildlife and peace and quiet. On this stretch, you will float a few miles on the Red Creek before it’s juncture with the Black Creek and later, a few miles on the Pascagoula River. Red Creek lies within the realm of the Pascagoula swamp and this area offers some great backwater exploration. The final mile or so before the juncture with Black Creek flows within the Pascagoula River Wildlife Management Area. This route certainly provides unique scenery and great exploration opportunities.

38

Mississippi, Perry County

06 :60 hrs
16.5 mi
12.884357 ft
I

The Tallahala Creek runs down a narrow corridor of land, bounded on the west by the Okatoma Creek valley and on the east by Bogue Homa Creek. As a result, Tallahala has few notable tributaries and never gets a chance to grow. It is a very attractive stream with good fishing that is very rarely used by other paddlers or boaters. It is characterized by big woods, big cutovers, medium-sized sandbars, and lots of peace and quiet. It is too narrow and shallow to paddle until it reaches Highway 29 east of Ellisville and even then, logjams and shallows are quite burdensome. This stretch is quiet and pleasant and offers great scenery. Some unfortunate cutovers leave the banks empty for long stretches. However, when the cutovers end, the creek coasts between walls of big trees and high banks and in spring, flowering mountain laurels glow and a bounty of other gorgeous wildflowers bloom.

39

Mississippi, Jones County

04 :15 hrs
10 mi
8.671078 ft
I

The Leaf River, like the Chickasawhay River, flows for more than 150 miles through southeast Mississippi before merging to for the Pascagoula. For most of its length it tends to be a bit small for many motor boaters and a bit big for many paddlers, making it an ideal spot for a quiet getaway. Many other rivers and creeks join the Leaf River along its course and it grows significantly before its terminus. The river widens considerably on this stretch and sandbars become vast. These sandbars are frequented by great blue herons that are often spotted snatching up fish from the river.

40

Mississippi, Holmes County

05 :39 hrs
13.3 mi
7.6185646 ft
I

The Big Black River slices diagonally across the state from northeast to southwest. It contains elements of both the Mississippi Delta and the piney hills and it includes sandbars and a few red clay bluffs. Some of the highlights found on this river include lush forest, plenty of sloughs for exploring, and great catfishing, but it is very muddy and the current is slow. The woods and wildlife make it worth it and paddlers return in spite of the mud. This section of the river offers many sloughs to explore where you can find a splendid array of trees and plants. Wildlife is abundant in these parts and is often spotted by quiet paddlers. Tracks of different animals and creatures can be seen in the wet ground and a variety of birds can be heard and seen in the trees and overhead.

41

Mississippi, Coahoma County

17 :48 hrs
41.9 mi
8.083706 ft
I

The Mississippi River is large, has a lot of power, and carries lots of tugboat traffic and for these reasons it demands extra caution. For long trips, paddling down the center of the river in as straight a line as possible and pulling aside for barge traffic is the best strategy. For short trips, paddling close to the shore to avoid traffic may be easiest. Hazards on this big river include strong upstream eddies and dangerous whirlpools. Although the difficulty rating of this river is Class I with no rapids, this river should not be attempted unless you are competent with a paddle. The woods and wildlife are phenomenal surrounding the 400 miles of river through Mississippi. On this section there are several really large islands and twists in the river. A large, thick forest surrounds the river and offers gorgeous scenery. You will find many sandy banks and sand bars and enjoy a very quiet paddle with great views.

42

Mississippi, Wiggins

02 :41 hrs
6.4 mi
9.027241 ft
I

Red Creek heads up around Lumberton and flows southeast, roughly paralleling the Black Creek when later the two creeks merge to form Big Black Creek. Red Creek is a paddling gem and is shallow and sandy as it flows through beautiful forest with much wildlife and peace and quiet. On this stretch, the creek is pretty open and requires portaging only rarely. It is studded with exquisite sandbars and other great scenery. The Creek’s only outfitter, Red Creek Camp and Canoe Rental, is located near the put-in.

43

Mississippi, Perry County

06 :27 hrs
15.2 mi
8.707474 ft
I

The Leaf River, like the Chickasawhay River, flows for more than 150 miles through southeast Mississippi before merging to for the Pascagoula. For most of its length it tends to be a bit small for many motor boaters and a bit big for many paddlers, making it an ideal spot for a quiet getaway. Many other rivers and creeks join the Leaf River along its course and it grows significantly before its terminus. On this section, the river is characterized by a wide channel, high clay banks, numerous large sandbars, and little sign of people except for occasional clusters of fishing camps. The route is usually wide open, though in places the river narrows and you must weave among fallen logs. The current is fairly strong but lacks shoals or rapids.

44

Mississippi, Sharkey County

06 :39 hrs
15.7 mi
9.568686 ft
I

The Sunflower River is a tributary of the Yazoo River, starting in the Delta at Long Lake and absorbs many other waterways on its journey through the Delta National Forest to its confluence with the Yazoo. Some trees are more than three hundred years old in the Green Ash Research Natural Area and beautiful, vine-draped trees and lush greenery fill the scenery on the rest of the river. Wildlife is abundant and signs of habitation are easily found. There is no shortage of natural beauty and serene atmosphere on the Sunflower River but mud and little to no current prove be its downfall. On this route there is no current and the scenery is not exactly charming for the first seven miles or so until you reach the boundaries of the national forest, but quiet paddlers may spot a black bear or alligators. Stay right at the fork as you approach the forest and here is where the peaceful solace of the Sunflower abounds. Because of the little-to-no current, shuttles can be avoided by paddling out-and-back and trips can be customized by length as well.

45

Mississippi, Lauderdale County

01 :05 hrs
2.5 mi
2.995369 ft
II

The Chunky River feeds the Chickasawhay River which later joins the Leaf River to form the Pascagoula. This is the northernmost tributary in the vast Pascagoula River system that is floatable. Some major characteristics of the Chunky River are long, still stretches alternating with gentle, rocky rapids. It flows through an area that lies at the fringe of the Appalachians and the scenery consists of rocks, cliffs, ferns, and hardwoods. This section flows through a very remote area, passing only one house and briefly approaching a railroad track.

46

Mississippi, George County

03 :51 hrs
9.1 mi
9.5169935 ft
I

Escatawpa River is a blackwater stream, its waters being stained by natural tannic acids leached from vegetation. It is a small stream that is floatable for about half of its length along the Mississippi-Alabama state line. The dark water is accented by porcelain-white sandbars and beautiful cypress trees and roots. This river contains unique beauty with a variety of scenic rewards. Many swift bends and occasional fallen logs demand precise maneuvering. On this stretch, the Escatawpa flows through lovely wooded surroundings. Pleasant sandbars appear sporadically and shady red-maple arbors at the edge of the river provide great resting stops.

47

Mississippi, Greene County

10 :06 hrs
23.8 mi
9.130009 ft
I

The Chickasawhay River flows for 159 miles at the fringe of the Appalachians and contains a variety of beautiful scenery. You will see pretty stone, encounter some muck, pass an intriguing region of waterfalls and alligators, as well as cliffs and swamps. Except for the lower reaches of the river where it becomes wide and deep, the Chickasawhay provides pleasant floating, with good fishing, and relatively little human contact. Because of its remoteness, wildlife thrives here and sightings are common. This section is wonderfully remote. There are long, lonely stretches of woods that are blissful to paddlers. But with the river deeper and wider, motorboats become more common as you near Leakesville.

48

Mississippi, Madison County

09 :13 hrs
21.8 mi
9.585133 ft
I

The Big Black River slices diagonally across the state from northeast to southwest. It contains elements of both the Mississippi Delta and the piney hills and it includes sandbars and a few red clay bluffs. Some of the highlights found on this river include lush forest, plenty of sloughs for exploring, and great catfishing, but it is very muddy and the current is slow. The woods and wildlife make it worth it and paddlers return in spite of the mud. Plenty of sloughs and oxbow lakes provide great detours on this section of the river. Views of wildlife, including abundant waterfowl, and gorgeous scenery in the lush forest are found on these detours. The presence of alligators, some reportedly as long as 16 feet, adds to the wildness of the river.

49

Mississippi, Copiah County

04 :44 hrs
11.2 mi
19.56075 ft
I

The Bayou Pierre River was named for its rocks. Pierre is French for stone, and bayou comes from a Choctaw term for stream. It is well-named as it contains gravel bars, colorful clays, and rock ledges. The river is shallow and meandering and has fascinating geology and wildlife. But the waterway suffers from considerable erosion and is difficult to paddle. Most of the good floating sections will most likely require occasional wading and towing.

50

Mississippi, Stone County

07 :02 hrs
16.6 mi
7.678855 ft
I

Red Creek heads up around Lumberton and flows southeast, roughly paralleling the Black Creek when later the two creeks merge to form Big Black Creek. Red Creek is a paddling gem and is shallow and sandy as it flows through beautiful forest with much wildlife and peace and quiet. The first three miles of this section flow through the beautiful De Soto National Forest. It then continues several more miles, part of it through the Red Creek Wildlife Management Area, to the community of Vestry.

51

Mississippi, Stone County

05 :54 hrs
14 mi
12.395649 ft
I

Red Creek heads up around Lumberton and flows southeast, roughly paralleling the Black Creek when later the two creeks merge to form Big Black Creek. Red Creek is a paddling gem and is shallow and sandy as it flows through beautiful forest with much wildlife and peace and quiet. On this stretch gorgeous sandbars and pretty trees grace the scenery and just a few miles before the take-out, it enters the De Soto National Forest.

52

Mississippi, Claiborne County

04 :57 hrs
11.7 mi
13.822878 ft
I

The Bayou Pierre River was named for its rocks. Pierre is French for stone, and bayou comes from a Choctaw term for stream. It is well-named as it contains gravel bars, colorful clays, and rock ledges. The river is shallow and meandering and has fascinating geology and wildlife. But the waterway suffers from considerable erosion and is difficult to paddle. Most of the good floating sections will most likely require occasional wading and towing. On this stretch the river passes some of those namesake rocky ledges. It also makes the transition from sandy hills to muddy floodplain before the take-out. Alligators up to 15 feet long are said to live in this area.

53

Mississippi, Simpson County

02 :09 hrs
5 mi
4.706581 ft
I

The Pearl River is one of the state’s most significant waterways and is not a typical paddling river, but it is both interesting and challenging. Challenges include logjams on the upper reaches followed by dwindling current as the river approaches Ross Barnett Reservoir. As the river nears the coast, some of the most impressive swamps in the state appear with a real sense of isolation and an abundance of wildlife. On the lower section of the Pearl, the river gradually widens as it courses through increasingly remote farm, pasture, and timberland. The paddling is fairly simple, with few obstacles and a good current. Wildlife is especially plentiful along these stretches

54

Mississippi, Lauderdale County

04 :12 hrs
10 mi
15.144485 ft
II

The Chunky River feeds the Chickasawhay River which joins the Leaf River to form the Pascagoula. This is the northernmost tributary in the vast Pascagoula River system that is floatable. Some major characteristics of the Chunky River are long, still stretches alternating with gentle, rocky rapids. It flows through an area that lies at the fringe of the Appalachians and the scenery consists of rocks, cliffs, ferns, and hardwoods. This section is particularly scenic, with rocky cliffs and lush vegetation. It is a good bass-fishing area too. Another highlight is the creaky iron Stucky Bridge that was first built in 1847.

55

Mississippi, Tishomingo County

01 :56 hrs
4.6 mi
7.8703003 ft
I

Bear Creek is an exceptionally beautiful small stream that runs through the heart of the Tishomingo State Park, the only state park with canoe rental and shuttle services. The landscape is rocky and hilly, and portions of the creek scoot over rocks for some exciting swifts. Other stretches are long, straight, and without current. While in the park’s boundaries the scenery includes towering stands of forest, tall canyon walls, and foliage that is lush green in the summer and stunningly colorful in the fall. On this section, log jams and strainers are a possibility as the creek twists and turns through a lush forest with often-overhanging trees.

56

Mississippi, Simpson County

04 :10 hrs
9.8 mi
10.859074 ft
I

The Pearl River is one of the state’s most significant waterways and is not a typical paddling river, but it is both interesting and challenging. Challenges include logjams on the upper reaches followed by dwindling current as the river approaches Ross Barnett Reservoir. As the river nears the coast, some of the most impressive swamps in the state appear with a real sense of isolation and an abundance of wildlife. On the lower section of the Pearl, the river gradually widens as it courses through increasingly remote farm, pasture, and timberland. The paddling is fairly simple, with few obstacles and a good current. Wildlife is especially plentiful along these stretches.

57

Mississippi, Greene County

06 :54 hrs
16.3 mi
8.023687 ft
I

The Leaf River, like the Chickasawhay River, flows for more than 150 miles through southeast Mississippi before merging to for the Pascagoula. For most of its length it tends to be a bit small for many motor boaters and a bit big for many paddlers, making it an ideal spot for a quiet getaway. Many other rivers and creeks join the Leaf River along its course and it grows significantly before its terminus. On this section, the river is characterized by a wide channel, high clay banks, numerous large sandbars, and little sign of people except for occasional clusters of fishing camps. The route is usually wide open, though in places the river narrows and you must weave among fallen logs. The current is fairly strong but lacks shoals or rapids.

58

Mississippi, Warren County

05 :60 hrs
14.1 mi
7.0079975 ft
I

The Big Black River slices diagonally across the state from northeast to southwest. It contains elements of both the Mississippi Delta and the piney hills and it includes sandbars and a few red clay bluffs. Some of the highlights found on this river include lush forest, plenty of sloughs for exploring, and great catfishing, but it is very muddy and the current is slow. The woods and wildlife make it worth it and paddlers return in spite of the mud. On this stretch of river, Campbell Swamp extends to the right several miles below the take-out and impressive stands of cypress and tupelo gum can be seen from the water. A rustic fallen-in bridge gives a bit of antiquity to the scenery.

59

Mississippi, Franklin County

02 :35 hrs
6.1 mi
8.633167 ft
I

The Homochitto River meanders through sparsely populated Franklin, Wilson, and south Adams and the Homochitto National Forest before emptying into the Mississippi River. It is quite shallow with a sandy bottom and it is notorious for its flash floods and shifting sands. The quick sands are very dangerous, taking the lives of many in the past, and huge amounts of riverside acreage cave into the river each year. Planning and foresight can subdue these challenges. Although there are endless shallows and broiling sands, many return to the Homochitto for its sweeping vistas and wildlife, ranging from bears to alligators. This section is the prettiest on the river. The water very clear and gorgeous trees line the river.

60

Mississippi, Pearl River County

05 :49 hrs
13.8 mi
17.909756 ft
I

The Wolf River offers near-pristine paddling for more than half its length. The stream begins west of Lumberton but doesn’t become navigable until the Silver Run community southeast of Poplarville and it eventually empties into St. Louis Bay. Its character changes several times making it fascinating to explore. This stretch is challenging with its swift, crooked, and narrow passage that requires a great deal of maneuvering. It offers great fishing for bream, bass, and some catfish. Small sandbars backed are backed by a thick forest of water oak, pine, and magnolia trees and provide beautiful, secluded scenery.

61

Mississippi, Walthall County

01 :31 hrs
3.6 mi
7.302723 ft
I

The Bogue Chitto River is tiny and logjammed in its upper reaches but as it extends into Pike County, it widens into one of the prettiest and most popular paddling rivers in Mississippi. It is not too small that you are constantly fighting logjams yet not too big that you are forever fighting headwinds. It has a swift current with sharp bends and submerged logs that will keep your attention. The river abounds in wildlife, the water is clear and the scenery is gorgeous, alternating with woods and sandbars. River roads roughly parallel the river on this stretch with many attractive houses. Large water oak and beech trees line the river as well as other pretty greenery adding to the scenery. Dillon Bridge is the last take-out before the river enters Louisiana for a distance.

62

Mississippi, Lawrence County

05 :54 hrs
13.9 mi
10.810364 ft
I

The Pearl River is one of the state’s most significant waterways and is not a typical paddling river, but it is both interesting and challenging. Challenges include logjams on the upper reaches followed by dwindling current as the river approaches Ross Barnett Reservoir. As the river nears the coast, some of the most impressive swamps in the state appear with a real sense of isolation and an abundance of wildlife. On the lower section of the Pearl, the river gradually widens as it courses through increasingly remote farm, pasture, and timberland. The paddling is fairly simple, with few obstacles and a good current. Wildlife is especially plentiful along these stretches.

63

Mississippi, George County

01 :49 hrs
4.3 mi
6.6331034 ft
I

Red Creek heads up around Lumberton and flows southeast, roughly paralleling the Black Creek when later the two creeks merge to form Big Black Creek. Red Creek is a paddling gem and is shallow and sandy as it flows through beautiful forest with much wildlife and peace and quiet. The river widens significantly on this stretch and the water deepens and darkens. Bayous appear and exploring them will reward you with great views of giant cypress trees.

64

Mississippi, Jones County

03 :04 hrs
7.2 mi
6.120247 ft
I

The Leaf River, like the Chickasawhay River, flows for more than 150 miles through southeast Mississippi before merging to for the Pascagoula. For most of its length it tends to be a bit small for many motor boaters and a bit big for many paddlers, making it an ideal spot for a quiet getaway. Many other rivers and creeks join the Leaf River along its course and it grows significantly before its terminus. The woods along this section of the river range from swampy cypress to dense canebrakes to tall pines. It is a good habitat for snakes as well as a variety of other wildlife.

65

Mississippi, Lauderdale County

04 :12 hrs
10 mi
15.144485 ft
II

The Chunky River feeds the Chickasawhay River which joins the Leaf River to form the Pascagoula. This is the northernmost tributary in the vast Pascagoula River system that is floatable. Some major characteristics of the Chunky River are long, still stretches alternating with gentle, rocky rapids. It flows through an area that lies at the fringe of the Appalachians and the scenery consists of rocks, cliffs, ferns, and hardwoods. This stretch is shallow and rocky as it flows past Dunn’s Falls Water Park that is known for its 65-foot waterfall that pours from a millpond dam down a rocky cliff into the Chunky River.

66

Mississippi, Forrest County

02 :39 hrs
6.3 mi
4.953312 ft
I

The Tallahala Creek runs down a narrow corridor of land, bounded on the west by the Okatoma Creek valley and on the east by Bogue Homa Creek. As a result, Tallahala has few notable tributaries and never gets a chance to grow. It is a very attractive stream with good fishing that is very rarely used by other paddlers or boaters. It is characterized by big woods, big cutovers, medium-sized sandbars, and lots of peace and quiet. It is too narrow and shallow to paddle until it reaches Highway 29 east of Ellisville and even then, logjams and shallows are quite burdensome. This stretch makes an admirable, and easy, day trip. A few springs feed the Tallahala and are pleasant to explore and in them are found pleasant gems of hidden nature.

67

Mississippi, Adams County

11 :41 hrs
27.5 mi
10.722595 ft
I

The Mississippi River is large, has a lot of power, and carries lots of tugboat traffic and for these reasons it demands extra caution. For long trips, paddling down the center of the river in as straight a line as possible and pulling aside for barge traffic is the best strategy. For short trips, paddling close to the shore to avoid traffic may be easiest. Hazards on this big river include strong upstream eddies and dangerous whirlpools. Although the difficulty rating of this river is Class I with no rapids, this river should not be attempted unless you are competent with a paddle. The woods and wildlife are phenomenal surrounding the 400 miles of river through Mississippi. This section runs through some of the most wild and beautiful scenery. St. Catherine Creek National Wildlife Refuge borders the river to the east and offers great natural views and lots of wildlife.

68

Mississippi, Vicksburg

13 :15 hrs
31.2 mi
7.7589884 ft
I

The Mississippi River is large, has a lot of power, and carries lots of tugboat traffic and for these reasons it demands extra caution. For long trips, paddling down the center of the river in as straight a line as possible and pulling aside for barge traffic is the best strategy. For short trips, paddling close to the shore to avoid traffic may be easiest. Hazards on this big river include strong upstream eddies and dangerous whirlpools. Although the difficulty rating of this river is Class I with no rapids, this river should not be attempted unless you are competent with a paddle. The woods and wildlife are phenomenal surrounding the 400 miles of river through Mississippi. On this section, you will experience lots of barge traffic just as you are starting. Views and scenery include beautiful forests, large sandy beaches, and some agricultural fields.

69

Mississippi, Jackson County

04 :04 hrs
4.8 mi
0.999272 ft
I

This is a gorgeous trip through a wonderful, marshy area with great scenery and views all around. Leaving from the Paige Bayou Marina, there are numerous paddling options that allow you to explore the marshes. There are great opportunities for viewing wildlife and observing a variety of marsh plants. There is virtually no current and no waves.

70

Mississippi, Jones County

04 :59 hrs
11.8 mi
9.529446 ft
I

The Leaf River, like the Chickasawhay River, flows for more than 150 miles through southeast Mississippi before merging to for the Pascagoula. For most of its length it tends to be a bit small for many motor boaters and a bit big for many paddlers, making it an ideal spot for a quiet getaway. Many other rivers and creeks join the Leaf River along its course and it grows significantly before its terminus. This section is the first on the Leaf that is easily passable without too many log jams and shoals. There may be a few still on this stretch but a significant tributary, the Oakohay Creek, enters from the west and makes this a great place for paddling.

71

Mississippi, Claiborne County

04 :04 hrs
9.6 mi
13.976006 ft
I

The Bayou Pierre River was named for its rocks. Pierre is French for stone, and bayou comes from a Choctaw term for stream. It is well-named as it contains gravel bars, colorful clays, and rock ledges. The river is shallow and meandering and has fascinating geology and wildlife. But the waterway suffers from considerable erosion and is difficult to paddle. Most of the good floating sections will most likely require occasional wading and towing. In this stretch the river cascades over clay shelves that are quite enjoyable to slide over.

72

Mississippi, Attala County

05 :43 hrs
13.5 mi
7.40757 ft
I

The Big Black River slices diagonally across the state from northeast to southwest. It contains elements of both the Mississippi Delta and the piney hills and it includes sandbars and a few red clay bluffs. Some of the highlights found on this river include lush forest, plenty of sloughs for exploring, and great catfishing, but it is very muddy and the current is slow. The woods and wildlife make it worth it and paddlers return in spite of the mud. This segment makes a good day trip with good access points and plenty of sandbars. There are a few camping options and great fishing. Plenty of smaller sloughs offer access to the swampy environs flanking the river. Paddling up a quiet, shady channel may provide the opportunity to view unsuspecting wildlife and the rich diversity of plants make for stunning scenery.

73

Mississippi, Jackson County

04 :36 hrs
10.8 mi
5.4999995 ft
I

Escatawpa River is a blackwater stream, its waters being stained by natural tannic acids leached from vegetation. It is a small stream that is floatable for about half of its length along the Mississippi-Alabama state line. The dark water is accented by porcelain-white sandbars and beautiful cypress trees and roots. This river contains unique beauty with a variety of scenic rewards. Many swift bends and occasional fallen logs demand precise maneuvering. This section grows noticeably swampy with several bayous and oxbow lakes providing great side trips. Gorgeous white spider lilies and titi bushes bloom in lake spring and early summer. These and other pretty plants flourish in the lower, swampy areas.

74

Mississippi, Claiborne County

03 :07 hrs
7.4 mi
11.450537 ft
I

The Bayou Pierre River was named for its rocks. Pierre is French for stone, and bayou comes from a Choctaw term for stream. It is well-named as it contains gravel bars, colorful clays, and rock ledges. The river is shallow and meandering and has fascinating geology and wildlife. But the waterway suffers from considerable erosion and is difficult to paddle. Most of the good floating sections will most likely require occasional wading and towing. On this section, the river passes under the Natchez Trace and just 2 miles downstream is the take-out. From the Trace down, the river is subject to high water with slow current and deep pools.

75

Mississippi, DeSoto County

09 :48 hrs
23.1 mi
11.239479 ft
I

The Mississippi River is large, has a lot of power, and carries lots of tugboat traffic and for these reasons it demands extra caution. For long trips, paddling down the center of the river in as straight a line as possible and pulling aside for barge traffic is the best strategy. For short trips, paddling close to the shore to avoid traffic may be easiest. Hazards on this big river include strong upstream eddies and dangerous whirlpools. Although the difficulty rating of this river is Class I with no rapids, this river should not be attempted unless you are competent with a paddle. The woods and wildlife are phenomenal surrounding the 400 miles of river through Mississippi. This section runs through a rural area with vast agricultural fields lying just beyond the forested area that lines the river. The scenery is beautiful as you pass many large sandbars, thick forest, and several large islands.

76

Mississippi, Clarke County

09 :29 hrs
22.4 mi
15.230202 ft
I

The Chickasawhay River flows for 159 miles at the fringe of the Appalachians and contains a variety of beautiful scenery. You will see pretty stone, encounter some muck, pass an intriguing region of waterfalls and alligators, as well as cliffs and swamps. Except for the lower reaches of the river where it becomes wide and deep, the Chickasawhay provides pleasant floating, with good fishing, and relatively little human contact. Because of its remoteness, wildlife thrives here and sightings are common. On this section, the river grows gradually wider and slower with many large sandbars. The banks get muddier and catfishing is popular.

77

Mississippi, Covington County

05 :43 hrs
13.5 mi
8.699856 ft
I

The Leaf River, like the Chickasawhay River, flows for more than 150 miles through southeast Mississippi before merging to for the Pascagoula. For most of its length it tends to be a bit small for many motor boaters and a bit big for many paddlers, making it an ideal spot for a quiet getaway. Many other rivers and creeks join the Leaf River along its course and it grows significantly before its terminus. On this stretch, big woods and occasional high, powdery sandbars line the banks. Springs pour through moss from undercut clay banks like open faucets and add to the beautiful scenery and views.

78

Mississippi, Yazoo County

11 :03 hrs
26 mi
7.6729794 ft
I

The Sunflower River is a tributary of the Yazoo River, starting in the Delta at Long Lake and absorbs many other waterways on its journey through the Delta National Forest to its confluence with the Yazoo. Some trees are more than three hundred years old in the Green Ash Research Natural Area and beautiful, vine-draped trees and lush greenery fill the scenery on the rest of the river. Wildlife is abundant and signs of habitation are easily found. There is no shortage of natural beauty and serene atmosphere on the Sunflower River but mud and little to no current prove be its downfall. On this section, the first few miles wind through gorgeous scenery of the national forest before emerging into farmland. From here, the river is flanked by vast agricultural fields and passes the quaint town of Holly Bluff and then alternates between open land and the national forest. Because of the little-to-no current, shuttles can be avoided by paddling out-and-back and trips can be customized by length as well.

79

Mississippi, Tishomingo County

01 :23 hrs
3.2 mi
2.8729095 ft
I

Bear Creek is an exceptionally beautiful small stream that runs through the heart of the Tishomingo State Park, the only state park with canoe rental and shuttle services. The landscape is rocky and hilly, and portions of the creek scoot over rocks for some exciting swifts. Other stretches are long, straight, and without current. While in the park’s boundaries the scenery includes towering stands of forest, tall canyon walls, and foliage that is lush green in the summer and stunningly colorful in the fall. This section is short and contains many twists and turns through a gorgeous forest and past some large, open fields.

80

Alabama, Millry

00 :51 hrs
2 mi
5.882805 ft
I

Washington County Lake, also known as Emmit Wood Lake, is a popular bass and bream fishing destination for locals, but also offers a beautiful relaxing paddling experience. Begin and end your trip on this 84 acre lake from a small boating dock located near the entrance on state lake road. A $3 day use fee is required.

81

Mississippi, Covington County

02 :26 hrs
5.8 mi
13.278679 ft
II

Mississippi is not a state that has a lot of whitewater. Several streams have occasional chutes and drop-offs, but only the Okatoma is renowned for its whitewater. The Okatoma Creek is just a regular Mississippi creek that happens to have four notable rapids on a popular stretch between Seminary and Sanford and minimal riffles and rapids elsewhere. This stretch from Sanford to Lux offers fewer thrills than the upstream section but still has some challenges.

82

Mississippi, Franklin County

10 :10 hrs
24.1 mi
24.718983 ft
I

The Homochitto River meanders through sparsely populated Franklin, Wilson, and south Adams and the Homochitto National Forest before emptying into the Mississippi River. It is quite shallow with a sandy bottom and it is notorious for its flash floods and shifting sands. The quick sands are very dangerous, taking the lives of many in the past, and huge amounts of riverside acreage cave into the river each year. Planning and foresight can subdue these challenges. Although there are endless shallows and broiling sands, many return to the Homochitto for its sweeping vistas and wildlife, ranging from bears to alligators. This section is long and lonely. The scenery alternates from woods to pastures and though more tributaries come in, it is still shallow.

83

Mississippi, Simpson County

04 :41 hrs
11.1 mi
15.157883 ft
II

Strong River begins in the Bienville National Forest near Morton and flows southwest past Pucket and Mendenhall before joining the Pearl River. Only about a third of its length is floatable from D’Lo Water Park down to the Pearl, and even some of the upper parts are too shallow at times. Most of the time the river is placid and very enjoyable but in extreme water conditions it may be unpredictably raging and dangerous. This stretch begins at D’Lo Water Park, locally known as “the rock”, where there is a campground and canoe rental and shuttle services. About five miles below the park, Merit Bridge crosses the river. It is a very beautiful historic iron bridge. Immense walls of hardwood forest with few sandbars provide stunning scenery and host a variety of wildlife. Just before the take-out there is a river-wide rapid that can be exciting and fun, provided there’s enough water to get over it. It can easily be avoided if desired.

84

Mississippi, Hattiesburg

04 :56 hrs
11.7 mi
10.032219 ft
I

The Leaf River, like the Chickasawhay River, flows for more than 150 miles through southeast Mississippi before merging to for the Pascagoula. For most of its length it tends to be a bit small for many motor boaters and a bit big for many paddlers, making it an ideal spot for a quiet getaway. Many other rivers and creeks join the Leaf River along its course and it grows significantly before its terminus. On this section, the river has acquired a couple more major tributaries and holds enough water and deep holes for motorboats. The beautiful, forested scenery remains and there is a lot for paddlers to explore and see.

85

Mississippi, Leake County

05 :26 hrs
12.8 mi
7.167679 ft
I

The Pearl River is one of the state’s most significant waterways and is not a typical paddling river, but it is both interesting and challenging. Challenges include logjams on the upper reaches followed by dwindling current as the river approaches Ross Barnett Reservoir. As the river nears the coast, some of the most impressive swamps in the state appear with a real sense of isolation and an abundance of wildlife. This stretch may pose obstacles of sandy shoals and fallen trees during time of low water. However, the Pearl widens and slows near the end of the route and these obstacles cease to be a problem.

86

Mississippi, Jones County

02 :32 hrs
6 mi
4.991493 ft
I

The Tallahala Creek runs down a narrow corridor of land, bounded on the west by the Okatoma Creek valley and on the east by Bogue Homa Creek. As a result, Tallahala has few notable tributaries and never gets a chance to grow. It is a very attractive stream with good fishing that is very rarely used by other paddlers or boaters. It is characterized by big woods, big cutovers, medium-sized sandbars, and lots of peace and quiet. It is too narrow and shallow to paddle until it reaches Highway 29 east of Ellisville and even then, logjams and shallows are quite burdensome. On this stretch the creek widens but shallows may still require some wading.

87

Mississippi, Franklin County

09 :02 hrs
21.4 mi
19.708427 ft
I

The Homochitto River meanders through sparsely populated Franklin, Wilson, and south Adams and the Homochitto National Forest before emptying into the Mississippi River. It is quite shallow with a sandy bottom and it is notorious for its flash floods and shifting sands. The quick sands are very dangerous, taking the lives of many in the past, and huge amounts of riverside acreage cave into the river each year. Planning and foresight can subdue these challenges. Although there are endless shallows and broiling sands, many return to the Homochitto for its sweeping vistas and wildlife, ranging from bears to alligators. This section has many large sandbars that often hold tracks of animals. Prints of alligator or black bears are not uncommon.

88

Mississippi, Franklin County

01 :48 hrs
4.2 mi
6.6840935 ft
I

The Homochitto River meanders through sparsely populated Franklin, Wilson, and south Adams and the Homochitto National Forest before emptying into the Mississippi River. It is quite shallow with a sandy bottom and it is notorious for its flash floods and shifting sands. The quick sands are very dangerous, taking the lives of many in the past, and huge amounts of riverside acreage cave into the river each year. Planning and foresight can subdue these challenges. Although there are endless shallows and broiling sands, many return to the Homochitto for its sweeping vistas and wildlife, ranging from bears to alligators. This section is very beautiful with great scenery and is one of the more accessible routes for a day trip.

89

Mississippi, Simpson County

05 :34 hrs
13.2 mi
12.074844 ft
II

Strong River begins in the Bienville National Forest near Morton and flows southwest past Pucket and Mendenhall before joining the Pearl River. Only about a third of its length is floatable from D’Lo Water Park down to the Pearl, and even some of the upper parts are too shallow at times. Most of the time the river is placid and very enjoyable but in extreme water conditions it may be unpredictably raging and dangerous. This stretch beings with a long rapid, then subsides into more quiet, leisurely water for the rest of the trip. Scenic bluffs tower over the south bank about five miles from the start and hundreds of vultures roost around a big old tree nearby. The put-in and take-out are steep and difficult.

90

Mississippi, Leake County

05 :40 hrs
13.3 mi
5.0250015 ft
I

The Pearl River is one of the state’s most significant waterways and is not a typical paddling river, but it is both interesting and challenging. Challenges include logjams on the upper reaches followed by dwindling current as the river approaches Ross Barnett Reservoir. As the river nears the coast, some of the most impressive swamps in the state appear with a real sense of isolation and an abundance of wildlife. This stretch is likely to be rife with logjams, however the beautiful sandbars and thick surrounding forest provide great scenery and the seclusion is very peaceful.

91

Mississippi, Harrison County

03 :34 hrs
8.4 mi
10.347893 ft
I

The Biloxi River is a typical coastal stream as it begins very narrow and within a few miles expands to become a wide estuary. This route begins and Highway 49 where it is a small, tumbling, woodland stream and it ends at Three Rivers Road just a few miles before it expands dramatically and meets the brackish backwater from Back Bay. The first half of this stretch runs through national forest and contains shoals and log jams and is not floatable at low water levels. Piney woods continue outside the national forest boundaries. The scenery is pleasant despite its proximity to the urban sprawl. Forest is still prominent and woodland creatures and songbirds can be seen and heard.

92

Mississippi, Franklin County

03 :18 hrs
7.8 mi
11.665997 ft
I

Good paddle with lots of wildlife and slow steady current on the Ouchita River. Begin off Hwy 84 in Eddiceton and take out at 98

93

Mississippi, Lauderdale County

03 :60 hrs
9.4 mi
16.30449 ft
II

The Chunky River is a short river, formed by the merging of Chunky Creek and Okahatta Creek just west of the town of Chunky, Mississippi. This section goes from Fish camp to Stuckey's Bridge. 7.5 ft water

94

Mississippi, Clarke County

04 :29 hrs
10.6 mi
15.852913 ft
III

This is a nice float on the Chickasawhay River with beautiful scenery. Takeout is in Stonewall.

95

Mississippi, Grenada County

11 :12 hrs
24.9 mi
12.799995 ft
I

Grenada Lake is the largest body of water in Mississippi with nearly 64,000 acres of water, 148 miles of shoreline, 16 boat ramps, boundless opportunities for camping, and many other great outdoor recreation opportunities. This is the perfect spot for family fun and is a popular destination for visitors year-round. In addition to the many water-base and other outdoor recreational activities, Grenada Lake hosts several fishing tournaments annually as well. It is home to Hugh White State Park and several other public use areas around its shores. The scenery is beautiful and there are lots of things to do and see.

96

Mississippi, Newton County

01 :29 hrs
3.3 mi
9.574905 ft
I

Turkey Creek Water Park features a 250-acre lake located just five miles southwest of Decatur. This is one of the most popular lakes around, attracting skiers, paddlers, fishermen, campers, and other outdoor enthusiasts. It is known for its conservation program and natural beauty. The shorelines are filled with wildflowers, thick forest, deer, squirrels, ducks, turkeys, and other wildlife. There is also a white sand beach for swimmers, wooded picnic areas, and nature trails.

97

Mississippi, Tate County

11 :19 hrs
25.1 mi
2.899994 ft
I

Arkabutla Lake is a reservoir on the Coldwater River in both Tate and DeSoto counties in north Mississippi. It is a beautiful and popular lake with an annual visitation exceeding 2 million people. To accommodate all of its visitors, there are many recreational opportunities and facilities available. The lake offers a fishing pier, swimming beach, accessible campgrounds, sailing, waterskiing, and paddling. Sailing is very popular because of the dependable winds. For paddlers, this is something of caution but there are small coves to escape the wind. Wind warning lights are visible from most areas on the lake. No alcohol is permitted and lifejacket wearing is strictly required. The scenery and natural beauty is wonderful while paddling Arkabutla Lake.

98

Mississippi, Lauderdale County

08 :34 hrs
19.1 mi
6.4999924 ft
I

Okatibbee Lake is an 11,000-acre project maintained by the Corps of Engineers that was developed for flood control and also offers many recreational opportunities. Surrounding the lake there is one campground, four day-use parks with boat ramps, and three designated swimming areas. The scenery is very natural and beautiful and wildlife is abundant and commonly seen from the water and along the shorelines. On the north side of the lake is the Okatibbee Wildlife Management Area that can be partially explored by canoe.

99

Mississippi, Wiggins

04 :16 hrs
9.5 mi
1.1998672 ft
I

Flint Creek Reservoir is a 600-acre lake located in the Flint Creek Water Park in Wiggins. The lake is stocked with bass, bream, crappie, and catfish. Boating, waterskiing, swimming, jet skiing, and paddling are other popular activities on the water. Also available is the parks waterslides. Many other family recreational opportunities are available. The scenery is wonderful and wildlife is abundant with thick, beautiful forest filling the shorelines. Wild turkey, deer, squirrels, ducks, and other waterfowl can often be found along the lakeside.

100

Louisiana, St. Tammany County

03 :16 hrs
7.3 mi
2.999998 ft
I

The Pearl River forms the border between Louisiana and Mississippi and offers some scenic paddling, especially the section that runs through the Pearl River Wildlife Management Area. The river widens as it enters Louisiana and splits into multiple channels. This section of river starts at Davis Landing on the most western river channel and follows the river south through swamp and marsh terrain to the take-out at Indian Village. The area is very rugged and full of wildlife, including gators.

101

Mississippi, Pontotoc County

04 :29 hrs
9.9 mi
2.3916245 ft
I

Trace Lake offers 565 acres of freshwater for fishing, paddling, and water sports. The lake is stocked with largemouth bass, channel catfish, redear sunfish, bluegill, and crappie. A fee is charged for use of the boat ramps but carry-in access is free. Water skiing is popular on the lake year-round. Trace Lake offers a quiet, natural retreat located just minutes from the excitement of Tupelo. A thick forest with lush foliage surrounds the lake and provides great scenery.

102

Mississippi, Ocean Springs

03 :24 hrs
8.5 mi
1.1764591 ft
SK II

The Gulf Islands National Seashore is one of the prime places to paddle along the Mississippi Coast and is headquartered in Ocean Springs. There are four bayous within the park. Halstead Bayou winds west past the campground, Stark Bayou runs north to a park road, a smaller bayou meanders east beside the William M. Colmer Visitor Center, and Davis Bayou opens out to Biloxi Bay. All of these areas offer a beautiful sample of marsh, an abundance of wildlife, and bird-crowded sand pits. All four of these bayous are easy paddling except Davis Bayou which is wide and subject to strong winds. When the breeze is light you can paddle inland several miles.

103

Mississippi, Lamar County

01 :48 hrs
4 mi
6.847458 ft
I

This water park offers a 600-acre lake for swimming, fishing, hiking, and boating. The park also has many scenic campsites and a variety of outdoor activities. The location is relatively remote and the scenery is very natural and beautiful. Thick forest surrounds the lake and wildlife is abundant. The lake has a great fishing population and is stocked regularly.

104

Alabama, Mobile County

06 :09 hrs
13.8 mi
13.630838 ft
I

Located in Mobile County Alabama, near the border of Mississippi, this trip begins off of Mason Ferry Road and travel alongs the swift flowing Escatawpa River ending at Escatawpa River Campground off of Moffett Road. Because of the deepness of the water in combination with the numerous sandbars located along the entire route, the Escatawpa River is known as a great “play river”. The sandbars are great areas to pull off for a lunch break or for camping if desired and the deep pools of water off the sandbars allow for swimming holes during breaks along the route. Various wildlife such as; deer, turtles, turkey, and hawks can be seen along the route. Bring insect repellent as mosquitoes may be present during sections of slower water flow. A $3 parking fee is required if you desire to park at Escatawpa River Campground.

105

Mississippi, Marshall County

00 :42 hrs
1.5 mi
5.5960083 ft
I

Spring Lake is the centerpiece of the gorgeous Wall Doxey State Park. The park offers an abundance of outdoor recreation opportunities in a setting that is rich in natural beauty. The lake is spring-fed and surrounded by a beautiful and thick forest. Fishing is great and bird watching is also enjoyed here. No swimming is permitted in the lake and boats must not exceed trolling speed.

106

Mississippi, Quitman

02 :57 hrs
6.6 mi
3.5999908 ft
I

Archusa Creek Reservoir is a 450-acre lake located on the east side of Quitman and is the centerpiece for the Archusa Creek Water Park. It has large fishing populations, especially for bass, catfish, perch, and bream. Swimming, boating, and waterskiing are among some of the most popular activities on the lake. Archusa Creek Water Park also offers other outdoor recreational opportunities. On the west side of the reservoir there is some residential development but most of the shoreline scenery is natural and very beautiful with thick forest all around. There are also a few forested islands on the water that are very pretty.

107

Mississippi, Tishomingo County

00 :30 hrs
1.1 mi
0.21250916 ft
I

Haynes Lake is a small, 45 acre lake located in the Tishomingo State Park. The lake is well-stocked with largemouth bass, bluegill, redear sunfish, and channel catfish and gasoline engines up to 10 horsepower are allowed. The lake and park are located in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains and the scenery and views are absolutely stunning. Steep forested hills surround the lake and offer a very quiet, secluded atmosphere. Tishomingo State Park has many other opportunities for recreation and enjoying the beauty of nature.

108

Mississippi, Noxubee County

01 :26 hrs
3.2 mi
3.9990845 ft
I

Bluff Lake is a 1200-acre lake that is located in the Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge consists of 48,000 acres of bottomland and upland forest that is occupied by a variety of game species, including quail, deer, and turkey. In addition, many other bird species inhabit the forests and a few notable ones are the wood stork and bald eagle. The Loakfoma and Bluff Lakes are perfect for quietly exploring and observing the gorgeous scenery and timid wildlife.

109

Mississippi, Lee County

02 :57 hrs
6.6 mi
6.999962 ft
I

Elvis Presley Lake is a 322 acre lake located in Tupelo. Here you can find some of the best water-related recreation opportunities around. Some of the amenities include a handicapped access fishing pier, shady shorelines great for bank fishing, a boat ramp, several camping pads, a pavilion, and picnic areas. The scenery is beautiful with thick forest surrounding the lake. The shoreline is irregular with many coves and long, finger-like projections from the lake body which give great opportunities to find a quiet place to enjoy nature.

110

Mississippi, Clarke County

00 :51 hrs
1.9 mi
6.8677673 ft
I

Ivy Lake is a beautiful 65- acre lake located in the middle of Clarkco State Park. There are several features that make this a great destination for paddling. Some of these include the 815 acres of gently rolling woodlands that surround that lake and provide a gorgeous background to the lake, the clear blue water, and the peace and tranquility found in this unspoiled natural setting. The lake is stocked with largemouth bass, bluegill, and channel catfish and offers good fishing year-round.

111

Mississippi, Wayne County

02 :53 hrs
6.4 mi
7.7999344 ft
I

Maynor Creek Water Park offers a 450-acre lake for fishing, boating, swimming, and waterskiing and is located just six miles west of Waynesboro. Fishing is great for bream, catfish, crappie, and Florida bass. The views are stunning with dogwoods and magnolias blooming in the spring and glorious autumn colors paint the scenery in the fall. Also available in the park are great campgrounds and picnic pavilions and some hiking opportunities.

112

Mississippi, Pike County

02 :00 hrs
4.5 mi
3.7999954 ft
I

Lake Tangipahoa is a 700-acre lake and is the focal point in the Percy Quinn State Park. Loblolly pines and stately magnolia trees, rolling hills, spectacular wildlife, and seasonal flowers surround the lake and fill the park, creating wonderful scenery and views from the water. Boating, swimming, and fishing are generally permitted on the lake, however fishing is closed until 2017. Many camping opportunities and other recreational activities are available in the park.

113

Mississippi, Lincoln County

02 :34 hrs
5.7 mi
4.976654 ft
I

Lake Lincoln is nestled in the shade of towering hardwood trees and is the center piece for the gorgeous Lake Lincoln State Park. This beautiful lake provides many recreational opportunities including boating, swimming, skiing, fishing, and paddling. Fish are stocked annually and the fishing is good. The scenery and clear blue water make a lovely paddling experience. The thick forest fills the shorelines and surrounding area and the park offers many other activities as well.

114

Louisiana, West Ferriday

01 :56 hrs
4.3 mi
1.8462095 ft
I

Bayou Cocodrie offers paddlers the opportunity to explore an area of some of some of the last remaining bottomland hardwoods in all of Louisiana. The designated scenic river offers lots of untouched wilderness scenery as well as birdwatching opportunity. This trip starts from the launch at the northern end of the wildlife management area and travels south on the bayou. The trip can easily be shortened or lengthened by paddling the bayou varying distances if desired.

115

Louisiana, Franklin County

06 :44 hrs
14.9 mi
5.0031147 ft
I

This section of the Tensas River is a good option for paddling as it runs right through a national wildlife refuge that offers a very remote setting and lots of opportunity for viewing wildlife, including bears. The river is surrounded by hardwood forests and undeveloped wilderness area. The trip starts at a primitive launch on Fool Lake and heads northwest to the convergence with the Tensas. From here paddlers will turn south and follow the river around a large bend to a take-out at Ben Lilly Launch.

116

Mississippi, Noxubee County

01 :50 hrs
4.1 mi
2.7999268 ft
I

Loakfoma Lake is a 600-acre lake that is located in the Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge consists of 48,000 acres of bottomland and upland forest that is occupied by a variety of game species, including quail, deer, and turkey. In addition, many other bird species inhabit the forests and a few notable ones are the wood stork and bald eagle. The Loakfoma and Bluff Lakes are perfect for quietly exploring and observing the gorgeous scenery and timid wildlife.

117

Mississippi, Adams County

01 :41 hrs
3.7 mi
7.084198 ft
I

Natchez Lake is a very pretty, 230-acre lake located in Natchez State Park just 10 miles north of historic Natchez. The lake is well-stocked with largemouth bass, bluegill, crappie, redear sunfish, and channel catfish and it holds the record for the largest bass in Mississippi history. The scenery consists of gorgeous, densely wooded rolling hills and it is very quiet and secluded.

118

Mississippi, Adams County

02 :08 hrs
4.8 mi
2.799943 ft
I

Butler Lake is a lake located just nine miles from Natchez, in the St. Catherine Creek National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge contains a diverse array of habitat types consisting of bottomland hardwoods, cypress swamps, upland hardwoods on the Loess Bluffs, and small cliffs made from a specific type of wind-blown sediment. It was established in 1990 to preserve, improve, and create habitat for waterfowl. In addition to waterfowl, other wildlife that can be found at the refuge is wood storks, the alligators, songbirds, and many more. The alligator gar is one of the unique species found here. They are large prehistoric fish that have been found as long as 10 feet and weighing up to 300 pounds. They live in lakes, bayous, slow-moving rivers, and some brackish coastal waters.

119

Mississippi, Rankin County

17 :39 hrs
39.2 mi
3.0999832 ft
I

The Ross R. Barnett Reservoir, sometimes referred to as “The Rez”, is an impoundment of the Pearl River. The 33,000-acre lake serves as the state’s largest drinking water resource. It features 105 miles of shoreline that are quite diverse and wonderful for exploring, especially Pelahatchie Bay and the northern end of the lake. There are numerous small islands and coves, great scenery, and many secluded areas for paddlers to enjoy.

120

Louisiana, Livingston County

01 :41 hrs
1.9 mi
1.1832402 ft
I

Tickfaw State Park provides visitors easy access to the Tickfaw River, a nice spot for a relaxing, scenic paddle through an area of diverse habitats. The flatwater river offers paddlers of all skill levels the opportunity to view wildlife, fish, and enjoy nature. The state park has boat rentals, camping, picnicing, and hiking trails.

121

Mississippi, Yalobusha County

08 :37 hrs
19.1 mi
8.799995 ft
I

Enid Lake is a 28,000-acre reservoir with parts that extend into three counties. It is surrounded by several state park areas, including Cossar State Park situated on a large peninsula on its southern shore. Fishing is very good and very popular. Common fish species include crappie, largemouth bass, catfish, and bream. The lake holds the world records for white crappie. The scenery is wonderfully diverse with white sandy beaches, marshy areas, many streams that are great for exploring, and thick forests that provide a great background for it all.

122

Arkansas, Phillips County

02 :41 hrs
6 mi
1.2362976 ft
I

Located very near the Mississippi River within the St. Francis National Forest Storm Creek Lake is surrounded by dense and pristine hardwood forest. Actually a small reservoir, this body of water has a long and irregular shoreline that creates plenty of small private coves to explore. Camping facilities are available adjacent to the lake.

123

Mississippi, Bolivar County

04 :37 hrs
10.3 mi
0.898571 ft
I

Lake Bolivar is a 1200-acre lake that averages a depth of only 5 feet. It contains a good population of a wide variety of fish and some aquatic vegetation includes duckweed and coontail. The lake is an ancient remnant of the Mississippi River created centuries ago by a natural cutoff at Bolivar Bend. There are dozens of pilings from an old bridge that extends across the lake which hold large numbers of bass. The scenery consists of lines of large cypress trees backed by vast agricultural fields.

124

Mississippi, Coahoma County

06 :27 hrs
14.3 mi
3.0999908 ft
I

Moon Lake is a 2300-acre lake located twenty miles south of Tunica’s casinos, just west of US-61 and is one of Mississippi River’s oxbow lakes. It is a shallow lake with the deepest points never reaching more than 35 feet and here is a great fishing population. It is well known for its crappie, catfish, and seasonal duck hunting. The lake is near the Mississippi River and provides many opportunities to view migratory birds. The water is still and this is a great destination for a quiet afternoon paddling and enjoying the tranquil beauty and solitude.

125

Mississippi, Tippah County

01 :39 hrs
3.7 mi
5.9999847 ft
I

Tippah County Lake is a 145 acre lake and is located just north of Ripley. There are great camping spots available and fishermen are likely to find a variety of fish, especially bass and crappie. The scenery is very green and beautiful with a thick, lush forest filling the shorelines. Some views over open meadows are also available. There are several coves around the lake where quiet and solitude can be found.

126

Arkansas, Lee County

04 :09 hrs
9.2 mi
1.0999908 ft
I

Bear Creek Lake is a medium size reservoir in the St. Francis National Forest near the Mississippi River. The lake is surrounded by dense hardwood forest and is particularly beautiful in the fall when colors are vibrant. Paddling here is made interesting by the lake’s long irregular shoreline that offers several branches and many coves to explore.

127

Mississippi, Lee County

03 :20 hrs
7.4 mi
2.5012436 ft
I

Lake Lamar Bruce is a 300 acre lake located in Saltillo in Lee County. The lake is stocked with a variety of fish and you can expect to find largemouth bass, carp, redear sunfish, bluegill, crappie, and channel catfish. A very thick, beautiful forest surrounds the lake and provides great views and scenery. Several homes are found around the shorelines but it is overall a very quiet and peaceful lake.

128

Mississippi, Wilkinson County

08 :56 hrs
19.8 mi
10.348099 ft
I

Lake Mary is located in Wilkinson County and is an oxbow lake of the Mississippi River. It has a large fishing population, especially in April and May. The scenery is exceptionally beautiful with thick forests all around and several large islands on the lake. At low water levels, nice sandy beaches are available and are great for swimmers. All of the property along Lake Mary Road is privately owned and should be respected.

129

Mississippi, Oktibbeha County

01 :57 hrs
4.3 mi
4.96994 ft
I

Oktibbeha County Lake is a 480-acre lake just 9 miles west of Starkville off of Highway 82. It has boat rental, camping, and other facilities available. Skiing is permitted on the lake from noon to sunset. It is in a relatively remote area with beautiful, thick forest surrounding the lake and providing wonderful scenery. A couple small creeks enter the lake and can be explored upstream for a quieter, more intimate setting to enjoy the scenery.

130

Mississippi, Washington County

07 :45 hrs
17.2 mi
4.199999 ft
I

Lake Washington is a 5000-acre lake that was anciently part of the Mississippi River and is located just 13 miles from Hollandale. It has a very large fishing population and contains a wide variety of fish species. Lake vegetation includes duckweed and cypress trees and the scenery is very attractive. Behind a thin line of trees that surrounds the lake is a vast expanse of agricultural fields. It is one of the largest natural lakes in Mississippi and is also one of the oldest.

131

Mississippi, Scott County

00 :20 hrs
0.7 mi
2.495224 ft
I

Golden Lake is a very small, 15-acre spring-fed lake and is located in Golden Memorial State Park. The lake is the focal point of the park with camping, hiking, fishing, and other recreational opportunities surrounding it. It is in a tranquil, secluded setting that is perfect for a getaway on the water. The lake is stocked with largemouth bass, bluegill, redear sunfish, and channel catfish. The scenery is gorgeous and consists of a thick hardwood forest.

132

Louisiana, Washington County

04 :14 hrs
9.5 mi
10.604332 ft
I

The Bogue Chitto is a calm and scenic river that starts in Mississippi and flows south into Louisiana providing paddlers plenty of river miles for exploration. The Bogue Chitto travels through heavily wooded terrain and is lined with lots of white sand and gravel bars. The river is popular for floating and is serviced by multiple rental companies. This section of the river starts at Highway 38 and travels south to the take-out at Highway 10 in Franklinton. The river does continue on and is good for floating after Highway 10 but public access sites are limited and use of rental companies may be needed.

133

Louisiana, St. Tammany County

03 :41 hrs
8.2 mi
1.0354614 ft
I

The Pearl River forms the border between Louisiana and Mississippi and offers some scenic paddling, especially the section that runs through the Pearl River Wildlife Management Area. The river widens as it enters Louisiana and splits into multiple channels. This section of river starts at Lock 1 on the northwestern side of the wildlife management area and follows a river channel south past lots of white sandbars and wooded terrain. The area is very rugged and full of wildlife, including gators. There are additional take-out spots locate downriver that can be used to lengthen the trip and explore more of the area if desired.

134

Louisiana, Washington County

02 :36 hrs
5.8 mi
4.686966 ft
I

The Bogue Chitto is a calm and scenic river that starts in Mississippi and flows south into Louisiana providing paddlers lots of river miles for exploration. The Bogue Chitto runs through heavily wooded terrain and is lined with lots of white sand and gravel bars. The river is popular for floating and is serviced by multiple rental companies. This section of the river starts at Highway 438 just south of the Mississippi/Louisiana border and flows south to the take-out at Highway 38. The river does continue on and is good for floating after Highway 38 for paddlers looking to add more distance.

135

Mississippi, Simpson County

01 :06 hrs
2.5 mi
3.7541351 ft
I

Simpson County Lake is a 76 acre lake located just north of Magee. There is great fishing for largemouth bass, crappie, bluegill, redear sunfish, and channel catfish. Other recreational opportunities are available including camping. The scenery is gorgeous as the shorelines are filled with a thick and lush forest. The lake is very secluded and quiet except for exposure to US highway 49 for a small section on the south end.

136

Alabama, Mobile County

12 :18 hrs
27.3 mi
1.6707268 ft
I

This section of Big Creek Lake begins from Fox Landing boat launch. From here travel the entire southern section of the lake exploring the various inlets, coves and sloughs with beautiful scenery all around. This lake is a popular area for fishing as well. End this trip by paddling back to Fox Landing Boat Launch. There is $5 fee for for using the boat launch. Multiple possible routes are available at this lake.

137

Louisiana, Covington

02 :46 hrs
3.1 mi
0.9630248 ft
I

This paddling trip starts from the Water Street launch on Bogue Falaya and travels south to the convergence with the Tchefuncte River. From this point paddlers can head up the Tchefuncte River and explore the scenic waterway for a few miles. The scenery includes some residential development mixed with lots of wooded shoreline.

138

Alabama, Mobile County

09 :36 hrs
21.3 mi
1.2041321 ft
I

This section of Big Creek Lake begins from Fox Landing boat launch. From here travel the entire northern section of the lake exploring the various inlets, coves and sloughs, with beautiful scenery all around. This lake is a popular area for fishing as well. End this trip by paddling back to Fox Landing Boat Launch. There is $5 fee for for using the boat launch. Multiple possible routes are available at this lake.

139

Mississippi, Covington County

00 :31 hrs
1.1 mi
1.5377045 ft
I

Dry Creek Lake is a 150-acre lake located in the Dry Creek Water Park near Mount Olive. There is a great fishing population and some species include Florida bass, catfish, and crappie. Boating, camping, canoeing, and picnicking are some of the popular activities on the lake with aluminum boat rentals available. The scenery is spectacular with thick forest filling the shorelines and no signs of human habitation to be seen. This is a small, quiet destination for paddling.

140

Mississippi, Hancock County

04 :30 hrs
10 mi
1.979567 ft
I

The Pearl River forms the border between Louisiana and Mississippi and offers some scenic paddling, especially the section that runs through the Pearl River Wildlife Management Area. The river widens as it enters Louisiana and splits into multiple channels. This trips launches from the bridge at Highway 90 on the main channel and explores both swamp and marshland area to the north and south. The multiple channels and waterways in this area provide paddlers with many different paddling options. The area is very rugged and full of wildlife, including gators and turtles.

141

Mississippi, Hinds County

00 :30 hrs
1.1 mi
1.8958969 ft
I

Mayes Lake is located in LeFleur’s Bluff State Park and is a small, 50-acre lake. It offers great fishing and is stocked with largemouth bass, crappie, bluegill, redear sunfish, and channel catfish. Only electric trolling motors are allowed. The lake is surrounded by lush greenery that protects it from the heart of urban Jackson. It is a great destination because of its convenience due to proximity to the city and the thick forest that offers beautiful scenery and isolation.

142

Mississippi, Marion County

01 :32 hrs
3.4 mi
3.016777 ft
I

Lake Bill Waller is a 168 acre lake just a few miles southeast of Columbia. It has great fishing and is stocked with largemouth bass, bluegill, redear sunfish, and channel catfish. Lots of aquatic vegetation and several coves around the shorelines provide good cover for fish and an abundance of nature for paddlers to enjoy. Thick forest surrounding the lake is very pretty as well.

143

Mississippi, Holmes County

00 :32 hrs
1.2 mi
5.605957 ft
I

English Lake is located in the beautiful Holmes County State Park and is surrounded by beautiful hardwood forests. The park is abundant with wildlife and the forest provides a very scenic backdrop for this picturesque lake. Fishing is good and the lake is stocked with largemouth bass, bluegill, and redear sunfish. A narrow land bridge separates English Lake from Odom Lake. Both are very pretty and fun to paddle.

144

Louisiana, Sun

01 :42 hrs
3.8 mi
1.796526 ft
I

The Bogue Chitto is a calm and scenic river that starts in Mississippi and flows south into Louisiana providing paddlers miles of river for exploration. The Bogue Chitto runs through mostly wooded terrain that offers nice scenery and wildlife viewing opportunity. The river is popular for floating and is serviced by multiple rental companies. This section of the river starts at Highway 21 north of Bush and runs northeast to the take-out at Lock 3 where there is an easily accessible launch site.

145

Mississippi, Ocean Springs

06 :15 hrs
15.6 mi
0.1 ft
SK III

Deer Island is on Biloxi Bay and is easily accessed from Davis Bayou of the Gulf Islands National Seashore. The island is five miles long and a quarter mile wide. A long sandy beach backed by pine forest and palmetto is very scenic and privately owned. As you circumnavigate the island, the water right off the shore is very shallow, allowing a closer, more peaceful look at the island and some distance from motor boats. At low tide sand flats arise. Dolphins are often seen around the offshore side. On the return trip the views are dominated by the urbanized coast as casino hotels line the shore.

146

Louisiana, Covington

01 :52 hrs
2.1 mi
0.4717513 ft
I

Bogue Falaya is a tributary of the Tchefuncte River and is a fun paddling destination located in the heart of suburban development in southeastern Louisiana. This trip starts at Bogue Falaya Wayside Park in Covington and flows south towards the convergence with Tchefuncte River. The park is only open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. so use an alternate put-in if launching before or after this timeframe. The trip can be done as an out-and-back trip or paddlers can continue downstream to one of the multiple access sites on the Tchefuncte.

147

Mississippi, Jefferson Davis County

00 :53 hrs
2 mi
3.2862244 ft
I

Lake Jeff Davis is a 100 acre lake located in Prentiss and offers good camping and fishing. There are several camping pads near the lake and it is stocked with largemouth bass, bluegill, redear sunfish, crappie, and channel catfish. The scenery is wooded and the lake contains lots of aquatic vegetation. It is very quiet and peaceful.

148

Louisiana, Pearl River

02 :38 hrs
5.9 mi
2.0999959 ft
I

The Pearl River forms the border between Louisiana and Mississippi and offers some scenic paddling, especially the section that runs through the Pearl River Wildlife Management Area. The river widens as it enters Louisiana and splits into multiple channels. This section of river starts at the launch site at Highway 59 and follows the river south through areas of swamp and marsh terrain to the take-out at Davis Landing. The area is very rugged and natural, and is full of lots of wildlife, including gators. There are also other smaller channels that branch off to the west that can be explored.

149

Mississippi, Copiah County

02 :25 hrs
5.4 mi
7.7891083 ft
I

Calling Panther Lake is a 512 acre lake located just 5 miles west of Crystal Springs. A thick and beautiful forest fills the shorelines and surrounds the lake, offering gorgeous scenery and views all around. The water is very clear and pretty and the dense foliage of the forest provides a very quiet and serene atmosphere. Camping is available and fishing is good for largemouth bass, crappie, bluegill, redear sunfish, and channel catfish.

150

Mississippi, Washington County

05 :28 hrs
12.1 mi
7.9325523 ft
I

Lake Lee is an oxbow lake off of the Mississippi River located several miles south of Greenville and adjacent to the small community of Wayside. The lake is well-known for its large fish population but has little visible cover. In the spring most of the fishing cover is in a willow field across the lake from Deerfield Landing. The scenery is very beautiful with marsh and forest filling the shorelines. It is very quiet and peaceful.

151

Louisiana, Tangipahoa County

02 :43 hrs
6.1 mi
4.744422 ft
I

The Tangipahoa River is a long clear river that runs through southeast Louisiana and provides over 30 miles of enjoyable paddling in a scenic wilderness area. This river has some flow to it and is lined with lots of gravel and sandbars, both of which are rare in Louisiana. This section of the river starts at the Highway 40 bridge west of Independence and travels south to a take-out on Highway 442. The river in this segment is easy to paddle with a nice flow and few obstructions. The river can be paddled for more miles before the put-in and after the take-out for visitors who want to paddle longer distances.

152

Mississippi, Leflore County

02 :15 hrs
5 mi
1.9999962 ft
I

Matthews Brake National Wildlife Refuge encompasses nearly 2500 acres in west-central Mississippi. The major natural feature of the refuge is Matthews Brake, a shallow oxbow lake. The lake’s vegetation consists of bald cypress and water tupelo trees in the deeper portions, with buttonbush, American lotus, and swamp privet thickets in more shallow water. The population of migratory birds is very large and supports about 200 species of birds throughout the year. This is a beautiful, quiet place to paddle and enjoy nature.

153

Mississippi, Scott County

01 :23 hrs
3.1 mi
1.5828552 ft
I

Located in Roosevelt State Park in Scott County, Shadow Lake is a beautiful, 150-acre lake that is great for paddling. It is conveniently located between Meridian and Jackson and is in the Bienville National Forest with great scenery and panoramic views. Within this natural oasis, wonderful peace and tranquility can be found while paddling this lake. As the lake is well-stocked with a variety of fish, the fishing is great and other recreational opportunities are available in the park as well.

154

Louisiana, St. Helena County

02 :46 hrs
6.2 mi
6.3673973 ft
I

The Amite River is a designated Natural Scenic River that offers paddlers lots of pristine scenery and wildlife viewing opportunity in southeast Louisiana. The section between Highway 432 and Highway 10 is the most scenic stretch of river that is easily accessible. The access from Highway 432 is not the most convenient but is possible by using a dirt path on the northeast side of the bridge. The only parking available at the put-in is on the shoulder of the road. The scenery along the way includes lots of undeveloped wooded terrain and large sandbars that contrast the green vegetation along the banks.

155

Mississippi, Winston County

00 :21 hrs
0.8 mi
11.179092 ft
I

Lake Toppasha is a small, 12-acre lake located in Legion State Park in Louisville. The lake offers great fishing and gorgeous scenery. Densely wooded hills surround the lake and provide great views. Largemouth bass, bluegill, and redear sunfish are stocked annually. Camping, hiking, and swimming are other popular activities in Legion State Park.

156

Mississippi, Jones County

02 :35 hrs
5.7 mi
1.4000778 ft
I

Lake Bogue Homa is an 882 acre lake and is located in Jones County just a few miles east of Laurel. There are a few camping spots at the lake and it is stocked with largemouth bass, crappie, bluegill, and channel catfish. The scenery is very pretty and forested with some marshy area on the north side. It is very pretty and very peaceful.

157

Louisiana, Covington

05 :21 hrs
11.9 mi
1.9398831 ft
I

This one-way downriver paddling trip follows the Bogue Falaya and Tchefuncte Rivers south of Covington to the mouth of Lake Pontchartrain. The scenery along the way is a mix of both residential development and undeveloped wooded terrain. The river is easy to paddle with minimal current and multiple access points. As the rivers nears the lake the terrain becomes much more swampy, providing paddlers with some additional waters that can be explored.

158

Mississippi, Lee County

01 :04 hrs
2.4 mi
6.3225555 ft
I

Located in Tombighee State Park just outside of Tupelo, Lake Lee is a small, 55-acre lake. It is very quiet, peaceful, and it offers stunning scenery. Boat ramps are available but are limited to trolling speeds only. The lake is well-stocked with largemouth bass, bluegill, redear sunfish, and channel catfish. The dense forest surrounding the lake maintains a calming and serene atmosphere on the beautiful, blue water.

159

Mississippi, Forrest County

02 :04 hrs
4.6 mi
4.7990494 ft
I

Lake Geiger is a 225-acre lake located in the Paul B. Johnson State Park and offers great freshwater fishing, water sports, paddling, and swimming. The lake is well-stocked with largemouth bass, crappie, bluegill, redear sunfish, and channel catfish. Surrounding the lake is a gorgeous hardwood forest, campgrounds, and hiking trails. Views from the water are stunning.

160

Mississippi, Rosedale

00 :35 hrs
1.3 mi
1.6956482 ft
I

Perry Martin Lake is a very small, 25-acre oxbow lake located in the Great River Road State Park. The park offers many opportunities for outdoor recreation but this picturesque lake is one of the main highlights. It is well-stocked with largemouth bass, bluegill, crappie, and channel catfish. This lake offers a very quiet, very intimate paddling experience with gorgeous scenery. The surrounding forest is thick with lush foliage that has much to offer for nature enthusiasts. A 75-foot observation tower is located in the park near the lake and is well-worth the effort for the panoramic views it presents.

161

Alabama, Lamar County

01 :06 hrs
2.4 mi
6.059616 ft
I

Located west Vernon, Alabama, the Lamar County Lake provides a great destination for paddlers and anglers. This 68 acre lake is nicely located within a heavily forested area with easy access. A fishing license is required to fish at the lake and a $3 launch permit is required for small personal boat users to access the lake. The lake also offers camping, cabin rentals and picnick areas.

162

Louisiana, Richland County

03 :17 hrs
8.2 mi
1.8957558 ft
SK I

Poverty Point Reservoir is a 2700-acre man-made lake that offers paddlers excellent birdwatching and wildlife viewing opportunity. The lake is part of a state park complex that provides easy access to the lake as well as lodging, camping, hiking, and swimming. The state park offers boat ramps on the north and south ends of the lake. The water can get rough when windy so stay close to the shoreline if the water is choppy.

163

Mississippi, Lowndes County

01 :27 hrs
3.2 mi
12.491699 ft
I

Lake Lowndes is a 150-acre lake and is the centerpiece for Lake Lowndes State Park just a few miles southeast of Columbus. The lake is popular for freshwater fishing and water sports and is well-stocked with largemouth bass, bluegill, crappie, redear sunfish, and channel catfish. Water skiing and other water sports are popular but are only permitted on weekends and holidays. To avoid a busy day on the lake and the wakes from the skiers, weekdays are best for paddling. The scenery consists of a thick, beautiful forest.

164

Mississippi, Panola County

14 :21 hrs
31.9 mi
1.7684402 ft
I

Sardis Lake is 58,000-acre reservoir located a few miles west of Tupelo. The John W. Kyle State Park is located on its shore and offers a wide array of recreational opportunities. Skiing, swimming, and fishing are just a few of the outdoor activities available. The scenery is wonderful with thick forests and an abundance of natural beauty. The lake levels are controlled by the US Army Corp of Engineers and the lake is generally lowered for flood control starting on July 1 to January 1 however, there are always low water ramps on the lake that are useable.

165

Mississippi, Washington County

00 :30 hrs
1.1 mi
0.59999657 ft
I

Alligator Lake, sometimes called Brushy Lake, is a small, 60 acre spring-fed lake that is located in the Leroy Percy State Park. The scenery is stunning as the lake is surrounded by a thick hardwood forest with cypress trees and ancient oaks with an abundance of beautiful moss. The park is well-known for its alligator population and the lake is stocked with largemouth bass, bluegill, redear, and channel catfish. Other recreational opportunities are available including hunting and camping.

166

Mississippi, Monroe County

01 :35 hrs
3.5 mi
1.3579178 ft
I

Lake Monroe is a 99 acre lake located several miles southwest of Amory. It is a beautiful lake with clear water and gorgeous scenery. Fishing is good largemouth bass, redear sunfish, crappie, bluegill, and channel catfish. There are several camping spots available at the lake. This is a very peaceful place to enjoy the water.

167

Louisiana, St. Tammany County

05 :59 hrs
6.7 mi
0.39999938 ft
I

This access site to Lake Pontchartrain is located at the end of Bayou Lacombe and is a good starting point for exploring the lakeshore along the St. Tammany Wildlife Refuge. The turnaround point for this trip is at the mouth of Cane Bayou but turning around sooner or paddling further are also options. There is also another option of padding in the opposite direction from the put-in and exploring the shoreline towards Big Branch Marsh WMA.

168

Louisiana, St. Tammany County

01 :35 hrs
1.8 mi
2.1678946 ft
I

Paddling Cane Bayou between U.S. 190 and Lake Pontchartrain is a short but scenic paddle located between Fontainebleau State Park and Big Branch Marsh Wildlife Refuge. The bayou offers a lot of rugged scenery and wildlife viewing opportunity. The trip can easily be lengthened by exploring some of the connecting sloughs and marshes along the way as well as exploring the Lake Pontchartrain lakeshore.

169

Mississippi, Covington County

01 :02 hrs
2.3 mi
1.9991684 ft
I

Lake Mike Connor is a small, 79-acre fishing lake located in Covington County just five miles west of Collins. There are over a dozen camping pads with hookups available at the lake. The fishing is great and is stocked with largemouth bass, crappie, bluegill, redear sunfish, channel catfish, and magnolia crappie. Beautiful forest surrounds the lake and provides stunning scenery and several fishing piers are available.

170

Mississippi, Kemper County

04 :20 hrs
9.6 mi
16.315125 ft
I

Kemper County Lake is a 595 acre lake in a relatively isolated area just outside of the town of De Kalb. Surrounding the lake is a thick forest with some marshy areas. The scenery is beautiful and very peaceful. There is good camping and great fishing available. Fish include largemouth bass, bluegill, redear sunfish, and channel catfish.

171

Mississippi, Hancock County

03 :38 hrs
9.1 mi
0.7040514 ft
SK II

Heron Bay is a bay located just nine miles from Pearlington, in Hancock County. This is a prime fishing spot and it is very pretty. Leaving from La France Marina, you will navigate through Campbell’s Inside Bayou, Peter’s Ditch, and Redfish Bayou before entering Heron Bay. The scenery on this route is very marshy. Vast and beautiful marshes extend for miles and provide habitat for many shorebirds and waterfowl. Very pretty marsh plants and other wildlife also add to the scenery. On the return trip through the canal, take caution for motor boats and large watercraft.

172

Mississippi, Marion County

01 :03 hrs
2.3 mi
1.7563667 ft
I

Lake Columbia is an 86 acre lake located just a few miles southeast of Columbia. It has a dozen camping pads with hookups and great fishing. The lake is stocked with largemouth bass, bluegill, redear sunfish, and channel catfish. Lots of aquatic vegetation and several coves around the shorelines provide good cover for fish and an abundance of nature for paddlers to enjoy. Thick forest surrounding the lake is very pretty as well.

173

Louisiana, Tangipahoa Parish County

04 :40 hrs
5.2 mi
0.13040048 ft
I

Manchac is a large lake swamp located northwest of New Orleans that provides lots of paddling destinations on its multiple lakes, rivers, and bayous. North Pass is a calm and easily accessible waterway located just south of the Joyce Wildlife Management Area that offers some nice scenery and wildlife viewing opportunity. Paddlers can explore the main waterway or venture off on the many sloughs and channels that spread through the area.

174

Mississippi, Lawrence County

01 :07 hrs
2.5 mi
6.1963882 ft
I

Lake Mary Crawford is a 130 acre lake located just a few miles west of Monticello. It is known for excellent bluegill and has a good population of largemouth bass, redear sunfish, crappie, and channel catfish. There are two fishing piers and two boat ramps to accommodate boats of all sizes. However, the lake is restricted to trolling speed only. The shorelines are forested and very scenic with some marshy areas as well. The clear water and secluded area make it very peaceful and beautiful.

175

Louisiana, Tangipahoa County

03 :45 hrs
8.4 mi
9.541107 ft
I

The Tangipahoa River is a long clear river that runs through southeast Louisiana and provides over 30 miles of enjoyable paddling through a wilderness setting. This river has some flow to it and is lined with lots of gravel and sandbars which is not as common in Louisiana. This section starts at the Highway 16 bridge just west of Amite and flows south through undeveloped wooded terrain to the take-out at Highway 40 bridge west of Independence.

176

Louisiana, Livingston County

03 :19 hrs
7.4 mi
1.9562583 ft
I

The Tickfaw River is a rugged and remote waterway that travels through heavily forested, undeveloped terrain in southeastern Louisiana. The river, unlike many of the nearby streams, has a minimal current, no sand or gravel bars, and consists of mostly muddy waters, making it a good option for paddlers seeking some variety. The river can be accessed at J&W Campground for a small launch fee and the take-out is at the state park which is easily accessible.

177

Mississippi, Louisville

00 :11 hrs
0.4 mi
3.296875 ft
I

Lakelet Palila is a very small, 4-acre lake located in Legion State Park in Louisville. The lake offers great fishing and gorgeous scenery. Densely wooded hills surround the lake and provide great views. Camping, hiking, and swimming are other popular activities in Legion State Park.

178

Alabama, Pickensville

04 :05 hrs
4.5 mi
0.0662117 ft
I

Located just west of Pickensville, Alabama, this particular region of Aliceville Lake can be accessed from the Pickensville Recreation Area boat ramp. From here travel through various side streams and sloughs exploring the lake and fishing. Return to the boat ramp to end this trip. The Pickensville Recreation area is great for the whole family offering multiple recreational activities such as; canoeing, kayaking, fishing, a swim area, ball court, hiking and a amphitheater. Camping and RV spots are available as well.

179

Louisiana, Tangipahoa County

09 :07 hrs
20.3 mi
9.961584 ft
I

The Tangipahoa River is a long clear river that runs through southeast Louisiana and provides miles of enjoyable paddling in a scenic wilderness area. This river has some flow to it and is lined with lots of gravel and sandbars, both of which are rare in Louisiana. This section of the river starts at the Highway 443 and travels south to a take-out Lee's Landing. There is no good access to the river between the put-in and the take-out so paddlers should only run this section if they are prepared for a long day trip on the river.

180

Mississippi, Hinds County

00 :59 hrs
2.2 mi
0.52010345 ft
I

Lake Dockery is a 55-acre lake in Hinds County. It is located west off of Interstate-55 at Byram. No skiing is permitted and there are no facilities except a ramp. Fishing is great and there are several fishing piers located around the shores. It is located in a residential area and some homes are seen from the water but the scenery is dominated by greenery and beautiful trees.

181

Mississippi, Neshoba County

01 :03 hrs
2.4 mi
2.341339 ft
I

Neshoba County Lake is a 138 acre lake located a few miles southeast of Philadelphia. The lake surface contains a lot of floating vegetation and the water clarity is very low. There is great fishing for largemouth bass, bluegill, redear sunfish, crappie, and channel catfish. Camping is also available. The swampy vegetation provides great cover for fish and can be interesting to explore for nature lovers. Thick forest fills the surrounding area.

182

Louisiana, East Feliciana County

06 :36 hrs
14.8 mi
17.084827 ft
I

The Amite River is a designated Natural Scenic River that offers paddlers lots of pristine scenery and wildlife viewing opportunity in southeast Louisiana. The section between Highway 10 and Highway and Highway 37 is probably the most accessible but much of the scenery along this stretch includes mining machinery, gravel pits, and sandbars that are evidence of the gravel mining industry in the area. The mining activity along this stretch of river can also result in silt making its way into the river which results in rougher paddling conditions.

183

Mississippi, Walthall County

00 :51 hrs
1.9 mi
4.511162 ft
I

Lake Walthall is a small, 55-acre fishing lake located near the small community, Tylertown. Densely forested hills surround the lake and provide great scenery and a very quiet and peaceful atmosphere. The lake is stocked with largemouth bass, bluegill, redear sunfish, and channel catfish. There is not a boat ramp so carry-in access is required on the south end of the lake near the fishing pier.

184

Mississippi, Lauderdale County

01 :14 hrs
2.8 mi
5.9781036 ft
I

Lake Tom Bailey is a 182 acre lake located in Lauderdale County just 8 miles east of Meridian. There are 22 camping pads with hookups and great fishing. Stocked fish species include largemouth bass, crappie, bluegill, and channel catfish. Beautiful forest surrounds the lake with some marshy areas as well. This is a fishing lake with a few good fishing piers. Some grassy park areas and a few homes also surround the lake.

185

Arkansas, Crittenden County

05 :30 hrs
12.2 mi
2.899929 ft
I

Horseshoe Lake is a small natural body of water at the edge of the Mississippi surrounded by wetlands and agricultural land. True to its name it is shaped much like a horseshoe the outer edge of which is occupied by many houseboats. At the lake are large old growth cypress trees to paddle through and the fishing is decent.

186

Louisiana, Tensas County

07 :27 hrs
18.6 mi
0.11536789 ft
SK III

Lake Bruin is a 3000-acre lake located on the western edge of Louisiana that is popular for water recreation including paddling along its miles of shoreline. The water can be easily accessed from a state park launch located on the southeast side of the lake. The state park also has a swimming beach, water playground, campgrounds, picnic areas, fishing pier, and canoe rentals.

187

Arkansas, Chicot County

14 :32 hrs
32.3 mi
2.599945 ft
I

Lake Chicot located in southwestern Arkansas offers paddlers the unique experience of exploring a former main channel of the Mississippi River that is now a natural lake. The shoreline here is largely developed by the town of Lake Village and is hemmed by agricultural lands.